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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Corbett in Multnomah County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Samuel Hill – “Road Builder”

1857 – 1931

 
 
Samuel Hill – “Road Builder” Marker (Composite photo) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
1. Samuel Hill – “Road Builder” Marker (Composite photo)
Inscription.

Not until this highway was built
was it possible to go up or down
the Columbia River Gorge -
Earliest period rafts and
dug-outs (native boats) –
Later period steamboats
and railroad –

Erected by loving friends
to the memory of Samuel Hill –
Alonzo Victor Lewis
sculptor
John G. Edwards
designer

 
Location. 45° 31.999′ N, 122° 15.62′ W. Marker is near Corbett, Oregon, in Multnomah County. Marker is on Historic Columbia River Highway west of East Knieriem Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located on the north side of the highway, at the entrance to the Portland Women's Forum Scenic State Viewpoint. Marker is at or near this postal address: 39210 Historic Columbia River Highway, Corbett OR 97019, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Chanticleer Point (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Chanticleer Point (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Vista House (approx. 0.9 miles away); Marshall N. Dana (approx. 0.9 miles
Samuel Hill – “Road Builder” Marker (<i>full view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
2. Samuel Hill – “Road Builder” Marker (full view)
away); Samuel C. Lancaster (approx. 0.9 miles away); Broughton’s Expedition (approx. one mile away); Corbett (approx. 1.6 miles away); Tad's Chicken 'N Dumplin's (approx. 5.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Corbett.
 
More about this marker. Marker consists of a bas-relief sculpture of Samuel Hill and a metal plaque, mounted on a large boulder in a small plaza beside the highway
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Hill, Samuel (1857-1931).
Samuel Hill made the Northwest his home for a little more than 30 years, leaving a legacy of philanthropy, monuments, and highways still visible in the twenty-first century. He made a small fortune in utilities and investments and spent most of it on other people, on causes and programs he believed in, and in traveling the world to promote peaceful trade and prosperity. His most notable achievement was the establishment of the Maryhill Museum of Art overlooking the Columbia River near Goldendale, Washington. (Submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Marker detail: Aboriginal Paradise (<i>other side of boulder</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
3. Marker detail: Aboriginal Paradise (other side of boulder)
 

2. Notable Oregonians: Samuel Hill - Good Roads Pioneer.
Hill spent much of his life applying his prodigious energy and talent to his vision for a better society, particularly through advocating for good roads in Oregon and Washington. Challenging the general belief that the rugged landscape was not suited for a highway, he launched a public relations campaign calling for a paved road through the Columbia River Gorge. In 1907, he purchased 6,000 acres about 100 miles east of Portland and began building a community called Maryhill. He even built, at his own expense, ten miles of demonstration road there to experiment with road building techniques and surfaces. It was the first macadam asphalt-paved road in the Pacific Northwest. (Submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Columbia River Highway.
Construction began after Hill and other enthusiasts persuaded the Multnomah County Commission and the state legislature that the route was an important part of a new state highway system. Ultimately, the road through the Gorge became part of a longer Columbia River Highway that stretched from the Oregon Coast to Pendleton, where it connected with the Old Oregon Trail Highway. (Submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Roads & Vehicles
 
Marker detail: Lewis & Clark (<i>other side of boulder</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
4. Marker detail: Lewis & Clark (other side of boulder)
Marker detail: Navigation (<i>other side of boulder</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
5. Marker detail: Navigation (other side of boulder)
Samuel Hill – “Road Builder” Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 12, 2015
6. Samuel Hill – “Road Builder” Marker (wide view)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 13, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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