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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
John Day in Grant County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

The Advent Christian Church

 
 
The Advent Christian Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2016
1. The Advent Christian Church Marker
Inscription.
This church was built in the late 1890s by an Advent Christian minister. Dedicated in 1900, it was used for worship until the 1930s.

After this congregation disbanded, the church was vacant for several years. During the early 1940s the church was utilized by other denominations until acquired by Seventh-Day Adventists in 1947.
 
Location. 44° 24.984′ N, 118° 57.241′ W. Marker is in John Day, Oregon, in Grant County. Marker is on West Main Street (U.S. 26) east of NW Bridge Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is mounted on a pole near the sidewalk, in front of the main entrance to the subject church. Marker is at or near this postal address: 291 West Main Street, John Day OR 97845, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. John Day/Canyon City (a few steps from this marker); The Adventist Christian Church (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Welcome to Kam Wah Chung (approx. 0.2 miles away); Kam Wah Chung Company Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); Civilian Conservation Corps (approx. mile away); As told by an old timer
The Advent Christian Church Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2016
2. The Advent Christian Church Marker (tall view)
(approx. 1.8 miles away); Welcome To Canyon City (approx. 1.9 miles away); Canyon City Mural (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in John Day.
 
More about this marker. Interestingly, you can see that some text on this marker has been redacted.
 
Regarding The Advent Christian Church. National Register of Historic Places (1992)
 
Also see . . .
1. Advent Christian Church.
Lay minister and carpenter Samuel Bayliss Hope led the members of the local Advent Christian Church congregation in construction 1898-1900. The church combined the overall Gothic Revival plan and form that remained popular for churches in that period with the rich ornamentation of the Victorian era, especially around the entry and steeple. It is believed that Hope was personally responsible for most of the decorative woodwork on both the interior and exterior, including the latest example of the extensive use of manually planed moldings in a historic building in Oregon. (Submitted on February 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. National Register of Historic Places.
Link includes architectural details and close-up pictures of the steeple ornamentation (Submitted on February 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Advent Christian Church (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2016
3. Advent Christian Church (wide view)
 
 
Categories. Churches & Religion
 
Advent Christian Church image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2016
4. Advent Christian Church
Advent Christian Church National Register of Historic Places Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 29, 2016
5. Advent Christian Church National Register of Historic Places Plaque
Outstandingly rich Victorian style ornamentation was applied to a classically simple Gothic Revival form in this 1900 church. It is believed that lay minister and carpenter Samuel Bayliss Hope was personally responsible for most of the decorative woodwork, including the unusually late use of hand-planed moldings.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 16, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 69 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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