Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Coos Bay in Coos County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

The Changing Waterfront

(center panel)

 
 
The Changing Waterfront Marker (<i>center panel</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2015
1. The Changing Waterfront Marker (center panel)
Inscription.
The shipping channel in the bay in front of you has a depth of about 35 feet at low tide. Large ships travel in this channel on their way to the upper bay.

Frequently small harbor tugs can be seen pulling log rafts by this pavilion. The logs are loaded onto ships for transport.

The Coos Bay waterfront has been changing for many years. It looks very different now than it did in 1850 and in 1950. It will continue to change, influenced by people and the surrounding environment.
 
Location. 43° 22.048′ N, 124° 12.727′ W. Marker is in Coos Bay, Oregon, in Coos County. Marker is on Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) north of Anderson Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in an interpretive kiosk along the Coos Bay Board Walk. This marker is the center panel of a set of three related markers. Marker is in this post office area: Coos Bay OR 97420, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Changing Waterfront (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Changing Waterfront (here, next to this marker); Transportation (here, next to this marker); a different marker
Marker detail: The Coos Bay waterfront today image. Click for full size.
By Photograph courtesy Oregon International Port of Coos Bay
2. Marker detail: The Coos Bay waterfront today
also named Transportation (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Transportation (here, next to this marker); Welcome to the Oregon Coast (within shouting distance of this marker); Shipping (within shouting distance of this marker); Koos No. 2 (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Coos Bay.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Coos Bay Waterfront History
 
Also see . . .
1. A Bright Future.
The communities of North Bend, situated on the north bend of Coos Bay, and Marshfield, named after the Massachusetts hometown of the cityís founder, were established in the 1850s. North Bend began with a couple sawmills and several houses, and became a city through the efforts of lumberman Louis Simpson. Marshfield became an incorporated city in 1874, but didnít change its name to Coos Bay until 1944. Both cities were quite isolated from the rest of Oregon until the McCullough Memorial Bridge was completed in 1936, and in both cities, lumber was the major industry until the 1980s. After years of economic struggles due to declining timber revenue, Coos Bay and
Marker detail: Ship <i>M/V Columbia Bay</i> at dock image. Click for full size.
By Photograph courtesy Oregon International Port of Coos Bay, June 25, 2015
3. Marker detail: Ship M/V Columbia Bay at dock
North Bend are seeing a renaissance of tourism and culture. (Submitted on February 17, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Port of Coos Bay History.
Both sailing vessels and steamboats engaged in the early coastal shipping traffic which called at Coos Bay. The steamers carried passengers and freight, and sometimes bulk cargoes, while sailing ships carried mostly bulk cargoes of lumber and coal. As a rule, the bulk cargo carriers were laden with paying cargo only on the outbound leg of their journey. There was practically no incoming bulk cargo into Coos Bay, and as a consequence, the ships brought in quantities of stone as ballast. (Submitted on February 17, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable PlacesWaterways & Vessels
 
The Changing Waterfront Marker (<i>wide view of all three panels</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2015
4. The Changing Waterfront Marker (wide view of all three panels)
Tugboat <i>Captain Louie</i> pushing a barge image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2015
5. Tugboat Captain Louie pushing a barge
Built in 1961, Captain Louie was later widened, repowered, and fitted with a removable tower for pushing barges. All the work was done on a barge at Knutson Towboat's offices.
Tugboat <i>Gene Dunlap</i> (<i>view from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 25, 2015
6. Tugboat Gene Dunlap (view from near marker)
Vessel Gene Dunlap is a tug built in 1972 and currently sailing under the flag of USA. Gene Dunlap has 35m length overall and beam of 10m. Her gross tonnage is 321 tons
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 20, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 17, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 96 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on February 17, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   5, 6. submitted on February 19, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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