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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Coos Bay in Coos County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Tugboat Ancestors

 
 
Tugboat Ancestors Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
1. Tugboat Ancestors Marker
Inscription.
The first tugs on Coos Bay were steam-powered, usually towing log rafts or piloting sailing ships in and out of port.

Gasoline and diesel internal combustion engines arrived in the early 1900s and began to replace steam engines. By the 1950s the era of steam was over.

Where are they now?
Even though a well-built tug can last a long time, having a useful life of 50 years or more, it's a tough and sometimes dangerous life. Years ago many tugs were lost in stormy weather or wrecked crossing the bar. Now accidents are rare due to modern equipment and better knowledge of weather and sea conditions.
 
Location. 43° 22.087′ N, 124° 12.717′ W. Marker is in Coos Bay, Oregon, in Coos County. Marker is on Oregon Coast Highway (U.S. 101) north of Central Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in an interpretive kiosk along the Coos Bay Board Walk, overlooking the Marshfield Channel. Marker is in this post office area: Coos Bay OR 97420, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. What is a Tugboat? (here, next to this marker); Tug Power (here, next to this marker); Koos No. 2 (a few steps from this marker); Shipping (a few steps from this marker); The Changing Waterfront (within shouting distance
Tugboat Ancestors Marker (<i>wide view; Coos Bay Board Walk to the right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 24, 2015
2. Tugboat Ancestors Marker (wide view; Coos Bay Board Walk to the right)
of this marker); a different marker also named The Changing Waterfront (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Changing Waterfront (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to the Oregon Coast (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Coos Bay.
 
Also see . . .  Loss of the Fearless 20 Nov 1889.
Formerly a brig named the Star of China. Ran aground in 1873, refloated, and converted into a tugboat. Loss not discovered until the next day when debris and one survivor washed ashore. However, he perished before he could reveal the final fate of the Fearless. (Submitted on February 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
Marker detail: Steam Tugs <i>Columbia</i> (1892) and <i>Fearless</i> (1874) image. Click for full size.
Photograph courtesy of the Victor West Collection
3. Marker detail: Steam Tugs Columbia (1892) and Fearless (1874)
Steam Tug Columbia was built in 1892.
Steam Tug Fearless, built in 1874, lost in a storm at the mouth of the Umpqua River, 1889
Marker detail: Sternwheeler Steam Tug Powers, 1910 image. Click for full size.
By Photograph courtesy Knutson Towboat Company
4. Marker detail: Sternwheeler Steam Tug Powers, 1910
Marker detail: <i>Powers</i> towing a log raft, 1912 image. Click for full size.
By Photograph courtesy Knutson Towboat Company
5. Marker detail: Powers towing a log raft, 1912
The Powers was built at a Coos Bay shipyard, as was the steam tug Columbia.
Marker detail: Steam tug <i>Columbia</i> towing the <i>David Evans</i>, early 1900s image. Click for full size.
Photograph courtesy of the Victor West Collection
6. Marker detail: Steam tug Columbia towing the David Evans, early 1900s
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 18, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 54 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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