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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Augusta in Richmond County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Indians

 
 
Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 11, 2017
1. Indians Marker
Inscription.
Archaeological evidence has proven the existence of Indian villages in the Augusta area as early as 2,500 B.C., and a type of decorated pottery found at various sites is among the oldest in North America.

Just north of the present-day city of Augusta, the river falls across broken ridges of rock, allowing deer and buffalo, as well as the hunters that stalked them, a safe passage across the water. The area became a crossroads where several ancient Indian trails met at the river.

Even before the founding of the colony of Georgia, deerskin traders from South Carolina assembled at Fort Moore on the Carolina side of the river to organize caravans that ventured among Indian tribes as far west as the Mississippi.

General James Edward Oglethorpe, the founder of Georgia, commissioned the frontier outpost of Augusta in 1736, and described it as the "Key of all the Indian Countrey.”

Two major conferences of Indian chieftains and representatives of colonial governments held in Augusta in 1763 and 1773 resulted in land treaties which opened large areas to the north and west of Augusta for further settlement.
 
Location. 33° 28.696′ N, 81° 57.86′ W. Marker is in Augusta, Georgia, in Richmond County. Marker can be
Marker detail: drawing of Cherokee Indians image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 11, 2017
2. Marker detail: drawing of Cherokee Indians
An eighteenth century English drawing of Cherokee Indians. The title reads, "The Three Cherokees came over from the head of the River Savanna to London, 1762"
reached from 8th Street north of Reynolds Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located along the Augusta Riverwalk, between 8th Street and James Brown Boulevard. Marker is at or near this postal address: 15 8th Street, Augusta GA 30901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Industrial Heritage (a few steps from this marker); De Soto In Georgia (within shouting distance of this marker); Great Indian Warrior / Trading Path (within shouting distance of this marker); Cotton (within shouting distance of this marker); Founding of Augusta (within shouting distance of this marker); Floods (within shouting distance of this marker); William Bartram Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); The Great Fire of 1916 (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Augusta.
 
Also see . . .  History of Augusta, Georgia. Augusta, Georgia was first used by Native Americans as a place to cross the Savannah River, because of Augusta's location on the Fall Line. In 1736, two years after James Oglethorpe founded Savannah, he sent a detachment of troops on a journey up the Savannah River. He gave them an order to build at the head of the navigable part of the river. The job fell into the hands of Noble Jones, who created the settlement to provide a first line of defense against the Spanish and the French. Oglethorpe
Indians Marker (<i>wide view; Savannah River in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 11, 2017
3. Indians Marker (wide view; Savannah River in background)
then named the town Augusta, in honor of Princess Augusta, wife of Frederick, Prince of Wales. (Submitted on February 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 23, 2018. This page originally submitted on February 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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