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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cape May in Cape May County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Atlantic City Railroad - Cape May Division

 
 
Atlantic City Railroad - Cape May Division Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2017
1. Atlantic City Railroad - Cape May Division Marker
Inscription.
The Cape May Division of the Atlantic City (Philadelphia & Reading) Railroad ran from Winslow Junction to Cape May City with branches to Ocean City, Sea Isle City, Stone Harbor, and Wildwood. This railroad was initially instrumental in the development of many Cape May County resorts but later became significant in the development of industry and strategic defense. Within the ACRR-Cape May Division Historic District are resources from the railroads most historically significant years, 1893 to 1942. There are timber trestle and metal bridges; semaphore signals; the Rio Grande Station and Signal and Interlocking Tower (now at Cold Spring Village); the Cape May Court House Station; the Ocean City Station; and the Tuckahoe Station and Interlocking Tower.

In 1942, the moveable bridge carrying a branch over the Cape May Canal was reconstructed to better serve the magnesite plant at Cape May Point. Magnesite, a critical material in the manufacture of firebrick for steel production during WWII, was shipped by rail to Pittsburgh, making the plant a defense production facility. It was the largest customer for railroad freight south of Winslow Junction.
 
Location. 38° 58.889′ N, 74° 54.384′ W. Marker is in Cape May, New Jersey, in Cape
Atlantic City Railroad - Cape May Division Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2017
2. Atlantic City Railroad - Cape May Division Marker (tall view)
May County. Marker is at the intersection of Seashore Road (County Route 626) and Earl Drive, on the right when traveling north on Seashore Road. Touch for map. Marker is located on the Cold Spring Bike Path, about 1/2 mile north of Historic Cold Spring Village. Marker is at or near this postal address: 703 Seashore Road, Cape May NJ 08204, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Historic Cold Spring Village (approx. half a mile away); Dedicated to Lt. Richard Wickes (approx. mile away); Cape May County Fishermans Memorial (approx. 2 miles away); The Battle of Turtle Gut Inlet (approx. 3.4 miles away); S. S. Cape May (approx. 3.4 miles away); Edwin Joseph Hill, CMH (approx. 3.4 miles away); Edgar Arthur Draper (approx. 3 miles away); Lt. Richard Wickes (approx. 3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cape May.
 
More about this marker. Marker is also visible left of Shore Road (US Highway 9), which runs parallel to Seashore Road on the opposite (east) side of the bike path.
 
Also see . . .
1. What held up the railroad?.
While plans for a rail line seemed to be marching along, talk of War Between the States threatened to bring all commerce outside of Cape May to a screeching halt. Cape May County, sits below the Mason-Dixon Line and pro-North and pro-South debates began to divide
Atlantic City Railroad - Cape May Division Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2017
3. Atlantic City Railroad - Cape May Division Marker (wide view)
the county in the late 1850s. The majority of Cape May's visitors were southerners. Slavery had only recently been abolished in the state in 1846. Although the county tried to remain neutral, Rebel forces were moving closer to Washington, D.C. (Submitted on March 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines.
Competition was fierce and by its height in the 1920s competition between the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad (WJ&S, owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad) and the Atlantic City Railroad (owned by the Philadelphia and Reading Railway) was so intense that at one time both lines boasted some of the fastest trains in the world. Trains often raced one another so as to be the first to arrive at their destination. Racing was encouraged by the fact that in many areas, the two lines were only several hundred feet apart. On the Cape May lines, the trains were in sight of each other for 11 miles between Cape May Court House and Cape May. Over the last 5 miles into Cape May, the tracks were only 50 feet apart. (Submitted on March 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Cape May Seashore Lines.
The line to Cape May was built in 1863 by the Tuckahoe and Cape May Railroad, and operated by the Philadelphia and Reading Railway's Atlantic City Railroad and later Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines (PRSL). At one time, the rail line was known as "The Steel Speedway To The Shore”. Eventually it became part of Conrail, which ended passenger service on the line in 1981, ended freight service on October 10, 1983 and sold the line to New Jersey Transit as their Cape May Branch. (Submitted on March 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable PlacesRailroads & StreetcarsWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 64 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 3, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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