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Port Jefferson in Suffolk County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Delivered Afloat in the Harbor

 
 
Delivered Afloat in the Harbor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 8, 2017
1. Delivered Afloat in the Harbor Marker
Inscription.
Every contract for every vessel built in Port Jefferson stated that the ship was to be "Delivered Afloat in the Harbor." In the early days, Port Jefferson had several shipyards surrounding the harbor including the Bayles, Hawkins, Darling, and Mather Shipyards. In 1917, several yards along Port Jefferson's waterfront were consolidated into a single enterprise known as "Bayles Shipyard, Inc." At the end of World War I, the former Bayles property passed through several hands until the Incorporated Village of Port Jefferson purchased the 5.1-acre site in 1997. Harborfront Park was developed in honor of the village's fine maritime tradition.
Incorporated Village of Port Jefferson
Harborfront Park

Historic Marker Research and Design by Mildred L. Michos and Kenneth C. Brady. 2008.

 
Location. 40° 56.965′ N, 73° 4.04′ W. Marker is in Port Jefferson, New York, in Suffolk County. Marker can be reached from Pass Way north of East Broadway, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located at the center of Port Jefferson's Harborfront Park, overlooking the harbor. Marker is at or near this postal address: 101 East Broadway, Port Jefferson NY 11777, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
Marker detail: <i>Enchantress</i> & <i>Thomas L,</i> image. Click for full size.
Photos courtesy of the Port Jefferson Village Archive and Robert O'Rourk
2. Marker detail: Enchantress & Thomas L,
The ferro-cement brigantine Enchantress was built in Port Jefferson by David M. Kent and launched in 1975.

Launching of the 26-foot Thomas L, Port Jefferson harbor, 2001. Built by Dieter Lund, the Thomas L, was the last commercial steel vessel to be constructed at what is now Port Jefferson's Harborfront Park.
are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Well-Worn Ways (within shouting distance of this marker); The Anchor of Our Community (within shouting distance of this marker); Bayles Chandlery (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); First Baptist Church of Port Jefferson (approx. ¼ mile away); Roe Tavern (approx. 1.7 miles away); Selah B. Strong - Kate Strong House (approx. 2 miles away); Site of Strongs Neck Bridge (approx. 2.2 miles away); St. George’s Manor Cemetery (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Port Jefferson.
 
Also see . . .
1. Port Jefferson History.
Incorporated in 1963, Port Jefferson was originally called Drowned Meadow because the downtown area was tidal and "drowned" by the tide twice a day. Today’s Main Street was created when Capt. William L. Jones built a causeway across the 22 acre salt marsh in 1836. The marsh was then gradually filled in. Today’s Main Street was first called Jones Street. Its businesses supplemented the village’s shipbuilding industry which was the largest in Suffolk County. Four out of ten ships built in the county were constructed here. The village was the home of coastal schooner captains, blue water sailors and seamen. Most families had at least one or two members building ships or at sea. (Submitted on March 8, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Marker detail: Port Jefferson Harbor, 1906 image. Click for full size.
Arthur S. Greene, courtesy of the Port Jefferson Village Archive, 1906
3. Marker detail: Port Jefferson Harbor, 1906
 

2. The History of Port Jeff.
The Village’s shipbuilding industry spanned over a century, from approximately 1797 (when its first shipyard was built) to its close in the 1920’s. As a shipbuilding hub, Port Jefferson’s main role was to build and support ships that participated in coastal freighting trades. Well-known circus owner P.T. Barnum owned a segment of land running through the Village. He aimed to establish Port Jefferson as the home base for his circus, but would eventually sell his land after disapproving residents put a stop to his plans. (Submitted on March 8, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesNotable PlacesWaterways & Vessels
 
Marker detail: barge <i>Setauket</i> & steam yacht <i>Mahary</i> image. Click for full size.
Photos courtesy of the Port Jefferson Village Archive
4. Marker detail: barge Setauket & steam yacht Mahary
Launching of the wooden barge Setauket, Bayles Shipyard, Inc., May 1918. The 600-ton barge hauled steel frames and shapes to Port Jefferson, where the fabricated parts were assembled into ships.

The steam yacht Mahary was built at the Bales Shipyard and launched in 1909.
Marker detail: shipyard workers & Bayles Dock image. Click for full size.
Photos courtesy of the Port Jefferson Village Archive
5. Marker detail: shipyard workers & Bayles Dock
Bayles Shipyard workers and the schooner Palestine under construction. The yacht was launched in 1904.

Fitting out at Bayles dock.
Delivered Afloat in the Harbor Marker (<i>wide view; overlooking the harbor</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 8, 2017
6. Delivered Afloat in the Harbor Marker (wide view; overlooking the harbor)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 10, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 8, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 74 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 8, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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