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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Diego in San Diego County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation

The Celebration

 
 
San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 21, 2015
1. San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker
Inscription. Over the next four days the city's reception committee, headed by William Kettner, who would one day become the region's representative in the U.S. Congress, welcomed the men of the Fleet with an endless series of balls, guided tours, dinners, teas, and stage plays.

In response to the city's festive welcome, the fleet sent 64 companies of officers, bluejackets and Marines who paraded down Broadway. More than 75,000 excited onlookers watched while Governor James Gillett officially extended the state's welcome.

An editorial in the Evening Tribune stated: "It was only after the great American armada reached the port...that the people of this country awoke to the fact that San Diego was on the map."

San Diego made quite an impression on the Navy. In a speech during the grand review, a naval offical said, "San Diego." On December 4, 1910, the cruiser USS California sailed into the newly-dredged harbor and anchored near what is now known as G Street Pier located to your left.
 
Location. 32° 42.832′ N, 117° 10.609′ W. Marker is in San Diego, California, in San Diego County. Marker is on North Harbor Drive, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Located at the Stern of the USS Midway Museum Flight Deck. Marker is at or near this postal address: 910 North Harbor Drive, San Diego CA 92101, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.

San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, December 13, 2015
2. San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation (a few steps from this marker); Bridle-Arrest "Horns" (within shouting distance of this marker); Clifton A. F. Sprague, Vice Admiral, USN (approx. 0.2 miles away); United States Aircraft Carrier Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Diego.
 
Categories. Air & Space
 
San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 21, 2015
3. San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker
Sailors disembarked from whale boats at Broadway Pier after being towed from the Fleet by steam-driven launches. After assembling, they began a long march to City Heights, to begin their parade down Broadway.
San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 21, 2015
4. San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker
The city fathers went all out in their preparations to make the men of the Fleet feel welcome in San Diego. A special committee, headed by local insurance agent William Kettner, made sure the city presented its best face to its military and civilian visitors.
San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, June 21, 2015
5. San Diego: Birthplace of Naval Aviation Marker
Companies of sailors in full battle dress stepped off to begin their parade to the bay.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 10, 2018, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 70 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 10, 2018, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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