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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New London in New London County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

New London

 
 
New London Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 13, 2017
1. New London Marker (tall view)
Inscription.
New London was founded in 1646 by John Winthrop, the younger, who chose this shore-ringed "plantation” for its excellent harbor.

This land, with its great natural assets, attracted men of hardihood and valor and became one of the largest whaling ports in the country in the mid-19th century. As this industry waned, manufacturing flourished, bringing an influx of foreign labor which contributed immeasurably to the enrichment of community life.

The history of New London may be said to be concentrated in its seal, adopted when the city was incorporated in 1784… a full-rigged ship with all sails set and the motto "Mare Liberum,” meaning "Freedom of the Seas.”
 
Erected 1976 by The City of New London and the Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Location. 41° 21.309′ N, 72° 5.777′ W. Marker is in New London, Connecticut, in New London County. Marker is on Masonic Street east of Union Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located near the sidewalk on the back side of the New London City Hall Building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 181 State Street, New London CT 06320, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this
New London Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 13, 2017
2. New London Marker (wide view)
marker. The Submarine Industry (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The 19th Century Port (about 600 feet away); The Atlantic Trade (about 600 feet away); The Amistad Incident (about 600 feet away); The Roots of the US Coast Guard (about 600 feet away); Native Americans (about 700 feet away); Nathan Hale Schoolhouse (about 700 feet away); Revolutionary New London (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New London.
 
Also see . . .
1. Connecticut History: New London.
Incorporated in 1784 as one of the first five Connecticut cities, New London was the colony’s first official port. Trade with the West Indies and other colonies made it an important commercial hub. In the 19th century, New London was, by volume, the whaling and sealing industry’s second-largest New England port. (Submitted on March 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. History of New London.
Between New London and Barbados an early commercial intercourse was established. A regular voyage was made twice a year to that island with horses, cattle, beef, port, and frequently pipe staves, which were exchanged for sugar and molasses. This trade was the most lucrative business of the period. Merchants of Hartford, Middletown, and Wethersfield made shipments from this town. In 1666, MOULD and COIT, the leading ship-builders in New London, launched the New London, a seventy-ton vessel, being larger than any vessel heretofore constructed in the place. In 1678 the same builders completed the largest, undoubtedly, of all the vessels built by then, the John and Hester of about one hundred tons burden. (Submitted on March 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. New London, Connecticut.
For several decades beginning in the early 19th century, New London was one of the world's three busiest whaling ports, along with Nantucket and New Bedford, Massachusetts. The wealth that whaling brought into the city furnished the capital to fund much of the city's present architecture. New London subsequently became home to other shipping and manufacturing industries, but has gradually lost its commercial and industrial heart. New London is home to the United States Coast Guard Academy, Connecticut College, Mitchell College, and The Williams School. (Submitted on March 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. AgricultureIndustry & CommerceNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 13, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 66 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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