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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Coosa in Floyd County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery

 
 
Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, 2008
1. Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery Marker
Inscription. The first residence of missionaries sent in 1821 to establish the Turnip Mountain Mission to the Cherokees was located on this site, just north of the Cemetery wall. The mission, later known as Haweis, was built two miles to the east. Sardis Presbyterian Church was organized in November 1836. The first building, a log structure covered with plank, stood north of the Church. The present building was erected in 1855. The Sardis Brigade of the 6th Georgia Calvary was organized here May 9th 1861. Of the more than 235 graves in the Cemetery, 18 have been identified as those of Confederate veterans. The church became inactive in 1979 and in 1989 was deeded to the Sardis Preservation Society.

Placed on the National Register of Historic Places of the United States Department of the Interior January 2005
 
Location. 34° 15.931′ N, 85° 22.718′ W. Marker is near Coosa, Georgia, in Floyd County. Marker is on Georgia Route 20, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7104 GA 20 NW, Coosa GA 30129, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Dr. Elizur and Esther Butler, Missionaries to the Cherokee Indians (approx. 1.3 miles away); General Thomas Edwin Greenfield Ransom 1834-1864
Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 28, 2011
2. Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery Marker
(approx. 5.9 miles away); Berry Schools' Old Mill (approx. 8.4 miles away); Gen. N.B. Forrest Captured Col. A.D. Streight (approx. 9.5 miles away in Alabama); Berry College (approx. 11.2 miles away); Georgia School for the Deaf (approx. 11.2 miles away); Martha Berry’s Birthplace (approx. 11.3 miles away); Original Cabin (approx. 11.4 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Cemetery Survey List. This goes to a list of know graves located at this cemetery. (Submitted on September 15, 2008, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Former Pastor at Sardis Presbyterian Church
My Great Grandfather, Rev. Thaddeus Constantine Crawford, was former pastor for many years at Sardis Presbyterian Church.
    — Submitted February 10, 2009, by Agnes Crawford Conway of Rock Hill, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Antebellum South, USCemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.Native AmericansSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 28, 2011
3. Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery Marker
The church is in the distance.
Sardis Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, 2008
4. Sardis Presbyterian Church
Sardis Presbyterian Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, 2008
5. Sardis Presbyterian Cemetery
"Of the more than 235 graves in the Cemetery, 18 have been identified as those of Confederate veterans."
Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By David Tibbs, 2008
6. Sardis Presbyterian Church & Cemetery
This is a view showing the side of the church near the entrance to the cemetery. Note headstones in the picture.
Sardis Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, August 28, 2011
7. Sardis Presbyterian Church
As mentioned on the marker, the church was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. The plaque is adjacent to a front door.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 15, 2008, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,897 times since then and 57 times this year. Last updated on September 16, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1. submitted on September 15, 2008, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.   2, 3. submitted on November 25, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on September 15, 2008, by David Tibbs of Resaca, Georgia.   7. submitted on November 25, 2011, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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