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Mill Branch in Florence County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Burch's Mill: South Carolinaís First Civil War Nears Itís End

 
 
Burch's Mill: South Carolinaís First Civil War Nears Itís End Marker image. Click for full size.
By Neil O. Myers, March 28, 2018
1. Burch's Mill: South Carolinaís First Civil War Nears Itís End Marker
Inscription. In South Carolina, the Revolutionary War had many of the characteristics of a civil war, with those who supported independence, (the Whigs or Patriots) fighting against neighbors and kinsfolk who remained loyal to the King (the Tories or Loyalists). Both sides commandeered food, supplies, horses, and livestock from the rural population, while most of the people ~ black, white, and red ~ probably just wanted to be left alone.

Late in the spring of 1782, with the British military efforts in South Carolina collapsing, a treaty between Brig. Gen. Francis Marion and Pee Dee Loyalist leader, Maj. Micaiah Ganey, was soon to expire. On June 2 Marion wrote Ganey that they should come to a new agreement in order to prevent the “effusion of blood and distress of the women and children.” Marion invited him to meet near here at Burchís Mill, site of a farming settlement, grist mill, and river ferry ~ and a well known stopping place for Whig, Tory and British forces alike.

On June 8, 1782, after an intense negotiation, Marion and Ganey signed a new treaty in which the loyalist agreed to lay down their arms, return civilian property where possible, and serve in the Patriot Militia for six months. The agreement signaled the end of partisan warfare in the Pee Dee region.
 
Erected 2012
Burch's Mill: South Carolina's First Civil War Nears It's End Marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
2. Burch's Mill: South Carolina's First Civil War Nears It's End Marker
Unfortunately this marker has met with vandalism
by Francis Marion Trail Commission of Francis Marion University.
 
Location. 34° 3.844′ N, 79° 31.714′ W. Marker is in Mill Branch, South Carolina, in Florence County. Marker is on Mill Branch Road. Touch for map. The marker is at the end of Mill Branch Road at the Great Pee Dee River. Marker is in this post office area: Pamplico SC 29583, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Dewitt Bluff (approx. 5.1 miles away); Hopewell Presbyterian Church (approx. 7 miles away); William W. Harllee (approx. 7 miles away); Confederate Navy Yard (approx. 9.7 miles away); Red Doe (approx. 10.3 miles away); Mt. Zion Methodist Church (approx. 10.3 miles away); Mt. Zion Rosenwald School (approx. 10.4 miles away); World War Memorial (approx. 10Ĺ miles away).
 
Regarding Burch's Mill: South Carolinaís First Civil War Nears Itís End. The 1825 Mill's Atlas map shown on this marker identifies Burch as his home and Burch's Ferry. The Burch you have an arrow going to was Joseph Burch, Jr., not the Sr. who died 1801. Joseph Burch, Sr.'s plantation home was on land near the ferry. See his Will for proof. Got land from Dr. Lynn
 
Additional comments.
Overview image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
3. Overview
1. Marker defaced

Marker has been cleaned & will have new photos soon, If you get there first take some pics. Thanks for waiting.
    — Submitted September 21, 2012, by C Summers of Manning, South Carolina.

 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Burch's Plantation image. Click for full size.
By Neil O. Myers, March 28, 2018
4. Burch's Plantation
The sketch shows Burch's original plantation purchased from Dr. Lynn where his home was located near his ferry. Reference SCDAH database for purchase and his Will's wording.
Top photo on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
5. Top photo on the marker
While Gen. Marion was camped at Burchís Mill, Jeff Butler, a Tory with a reputation for cruelty, came seeking amnesty. Some of Marionís men threatened to hang Butler, but Marion, citing the law of war and his own honor, removed him to safety.
Map on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Anna Inbody, March 18, 2012
6. Map on the marker
Burchís and Burchís Ferry as noted in Mills Atlas(1825). Archaeological and historical investigation indicates that a colonial settlement was located a few hundred yards from here, but the precise location where the treaty was negotiated and signed remains a mystery.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 10, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 19, 2012, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 780 times since then and 165 times this year. Last updated on March 23, 2018, by Neil O. Myers of Aiken, South Carolina. Photos:   1. submitted on April 9, 2018, by Neil O. Myers of Aiken, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on March 19, 2012, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina.   4. submitted on April 8, 2018, by Neil O. Myers of Aiken, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on March 19, 2012, by Anna Inbody of Columbia, South Carolina. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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