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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Boston in Suffolk County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Captain John Pulling Jr.

 
 
Captain John Pulling Jr. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 21, 2017
1. Captain John Pulling Jr. Marker
Inscription.

Merchant Vestryman and Compatriot of
Paul Revere
on April 18, 1775 called
Robert Newman

from his house on Salem St. to Christ church and lest the British disturb him, locked the church doors from outside while the lanterns were being displayed in the belfry. Later, Pulling escaped to Hull. In his memory and that of my grandmother, his great granddaughter Sandy Pulling Lane French, who often recounted the event, this tablet is placed by Winthrop Irving Perry.
 
Erected by Winthrop Irving Perry.
 
Location. 42° 21.988′ N, 71° 3.257′ W. Marker is in Boston, Massachusetts, in Suffolk County. Marker can be reached from Salem Street north of Hull Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located in the Old North Church courtyard, on the north side of the church. Marker is a metal tablet mounted on the brick wall at the north side of the courtyard. Marker is at or near this postal address: 193 Salem Street, Boston MA 02113, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Robert Newman (a few steps from this marker); North Church Lanterns (within shouting distance of this marker); Signal Lanterns of Paul Revere
Captain John Pulling Jr. Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 21, 2017
2. Captain John Pulling Jr. Marker (wide view)
(within shouting distance of this marker); Clough House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Men of the North End (within shouting distance of this marker); Christ Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Samuel Tucker / Increase Mather / Edward Holyoke / Edward Everett / Christian Gullager (within shouting distance of this marker); John Greenwood / Ann Pollard / Harriot Keziah Hunt / Charlotte Saunders Cushman (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Boston.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. North Church Lanterns
 
Also see . . .
1. One if by land, two if by sea...
On the evening of April 18, 1775 Robert Newman and John Pulling quietly entered Old North and carefully climbed to the top of the church's bell tower. They briefly hung two lanterns near the windows and made their escape. This signal, from the tallest structure in the town of Boston, served as an early warning that a detachment of the British Army was crossing the Charles River and heading west towards the towns of Lexington and Concord. By the end of the next night,
North Church Steeple & Belfry (<i>view from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 21, 2017
3. North Church Steeple & Belfry (view from marker)
the American Revolutionary War had begun. (Submitted on March 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Old North Church.
On April 18, 1775 Paul Revere met up with the sexton Robert Newman to tell him how to signal the advancement of British troops towards Lexington and Concord. Newman then met fellow Sons of Liberty Captain Pulling and Thomas Bernard. Leaving Bernard to keep watch outside, Newman opened the church and he and Pulling climbed the stairs and ladders up eight stories to hang two lanterns for a few moments. It was long enough for patriots in Charlestown to learn what has been immortalized by the phrase "one if by land, two if by sea" in Longfellow’s poem. The British were advancing by boat across the Charles River. (Submitted on March 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Old North Church.
In April 1775, Paul Revere told three Boston patriots to hang two lanterns in the steeple. These men were the church sexton Robert Newman and Captain John Pulling—the two of whom historian David Hackett Fischer suggests each carried one lantern up to the steeple—as well as Thomas Bernard, who stood watch for British troops outside the church. The lanterns were displayed to send a warning to Charlestown patriots across the Charles River about the movements of the British Army. (Submitted on March 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 26, 2018. This page originally submitted on March 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 74 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on March 24, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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