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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Adairsville in Gordon County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Cherokee Nation

 
 
Cherokee Nation Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 26, 2008
1. Cherokee Nation Marker
Inscription. During the early 1800ís, northern Georgia was heart of the sovereign, independent Cherokee Indian Nation. By this time Cherokee were the most progressive Indian tribe in North America. In 1821, they became the first American Indians with a written form of their native language, invented by Sequoyah, an uneducated Cherokee.

New Echota, the Cherokee national capital, was located 10 miles north. There a constitutional government of executive, legislative, and judicial branches ruled the Nation. Once the largest town in the area, New Echota consisted of houses, stores, taverns, a Council house, Supreme Court house, and a printing office which published a national bilingual newspaper, the CHEROKEE PHOENIX.

Most of the 17,000 Cherokee were farmers and lived in small log cabins but some grew very wealthy and owned great plantations such as the Vann House, located 27 miles north.

In 1838, at gunpoint, the Cherokee were rounded up and imprisoned by state and federal armies. Later that year they were forced to what is now Oklahoma. Four thousand Cherokees died on the terrible march west known as the “Trail of Tears”
 
Erected 1983 by Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (Marker Number 064-32.)
 
Marker series.
Cherokee Nation Marker as originally erected in another part of the Rest Area. image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, circa 1990
2. Cherokee Nation Marker as originally erected in another part of the Rest Area.
This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission, and the Trail of Tears marker series.
 
Location. 34° 24.55′ N, 84° 55.058′ W. Marker is in Adairsville, Georgia, in Gordon County. Marker can be reached from Interstate 75 3 miles north of Georgia Route 140. Touch for map. The marker is located at the upper section of the northbound rest area on I-75. Marker is in this post office area: Adairsville GA 30103, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Site of the Robert C. Saxon House (approx. 1.1 miles away); Oothcaloga Valley (approx. 1.2 miles away); Original Site Adairsville — 1830ís (approx. 1.3 miles away); Major John Lewis (approx. 2.1 miles away); Historic Trimble House (approx. 2.2 miles away); Oothcaloga Mission (was approx. 2.6 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Mosteller's Mills (approx. 3 miles away); Johnston's Army at Adairsville (approx. 3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Adairsville.
 
Categories. Native Americans
 
The Rest Area in 2008, with Cherokee Nation and Blue Star Memorial Highway markers. image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, June 26, 2008
3. The Rest Area in 2008, with Cherokee Nation and Blue Star Memorial Highway markers.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 17, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,558 times since then and 65 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 17, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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