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Concord in Merrimack County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

John Gilbert Winant (1889-1947)

 
 
John Gilbert Winant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2017
1. John Gilbert Winant Marker
Inscription.
”Wanting not only for ourselves but for others also, a fairer chance for all people everywhere.”

World War I pilot, New Hampshire’s youngest governor, and first head of Social Security, he was appointed U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain in February 1941.

His compassion made him one of New Hampshire’s most beloved governors. During the Great Depression, he stopped to chat with unemployed men, typically giving them a 50-cent piece, enough for a meal and a bed.

His efforts as governor helped establish a minimum wage for women and children, set aside land for state forests, and create the League of New Hampshire Craftsmen.

During World War II, the ambassador became a hero to the British people for helping secure U.S. assistance in the war effort and for his kindness and courage in the streets of London during the Nazi Blitz.
 
Erected 2017.
 
Location. 43° 12.436′ N, 71° 32.323′ W. Marker is in Concord, New Hampshire, in Merrimack County. Marker is on Park Street east of North State Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker and John Gilbert Winant statue are located beside the sidewalk, next to a bench, in front of the main
John Gilbert Winant marker, bench & statue (<i>wide view; unrelated marker at right</i>) image. Click for full size.
2. John Gilbert Winant marker, bench & statue (wide view; unrelated marker at right)
entrance to the New Hampshire State Library. Marker is at or near this postal address: 20 Park Street, Concord NH 03301, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. New Hampshire's Presidential Primary (a few steps from this marker); George Hamilton Perkins (within shouting distance of this marker); New Hampshire State House Chambers (within shouting distance of this marker); Daniel Webster (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); John P. Hale (about 300 feet away); Grand Army of the Republic Memorial (about 400 feet away); Maj. Gen. John Stark (about 400 feet away); Dedicated to You, A Free Citizen in a Free Land (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Concord.
 
More about this marker. Marker is a low, engraved, granite dividing wall positioned near the sidewalk, beside the bench and John Gilbert Winant statue.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Gilbert Winant.
Winant, born in 1889, first encountered Concord as a student and later as a teacher at St. Paul’s School. A decorated pilot during World War I, Winant married a wealthy New York socialite, Constance Rivington; they lived in a grand white house on Pleasant Street (the Unitarian-Universalist Church now stands on the site). Despite this elite background, Winant charmed
John Gilbert Winant statue installation image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2017
3. John Gilbert Winant statue installation
The current New Hampshire Governor, Chris Sununu, as well as CSPAN and local television news crews, were on hand for installation of the John Gilbert Winant statue which accompanies this marker.
the poor as well as the rich. Campaigning as a Republican with a rumpled, shy, tongue-tied demeanor, Winant won election as New Hampshire’s governor – the nation’s youngest – in 1924. He was elected again in 1930 and re-elected in 1932. America at that time slumped into the Great Depression of the 1930s, with one resident out of every five out of work. (Submitted on April 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Tragic Love Affair of Former NH Gov. John Winant and Sarah Churchill.
Former New Hampshire Gov. John Winant carried on a secret love affair with Winston Churchill’s favorite daughter during World War II. It cost him his life. In 1941, President Roosevelt appointed him U.S. Ambassador to the United Kingdom to replace Joseph P. Kennedy, who wanted to appease Hitler rather than fight. Roosevelt called the idealistic Winant ‘Utopian John.' He was rich, handsome, likable, gentle, dreamy -- and doomed by his hopeless love affair with Sarah Churchill. (Submitted on April 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. John G. Winant Jr., Prisoner Of Germans During World War II.
(New York Times Obituary - 11/02/1993) John Gilbert Winant Jr., who attracted international attention when he was captured by the Germans during World War II while his father was the United States Ambassador to Britain, died on Sunday at Princeton Hospital. He was 71 and lived in Princeton. Mr. Winant's father, John Gilbert Winant, was also a three-term
John Gilbert Winant statue installation image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 26, 2017
4. John Gilbert Winant statue installation
Installation of the John Gilbert Winant Statue which accompanies this marker. The marker text is engraved on top of the low granite dividing wall in the foreground.
Republican Governor of New Hampshire and Director General of the International Labor Office in Geneva. (Submitted on April 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. John Gilbert Winant.
(This link presents many photographs and facts bout John Gilbert Winant.) Three-time New Hampshire Governor and World War II U. S. Ambassador to Great Britain (Court of St. James) John Gilbert Winant, state house portrait, second floor hallway, senate side. Ruth L. Berry, oil on canvas, presented at Representatives Hall to a joint session of the Governor and Council and the General Court of the State of New Hampshire, July 25, 1951. (Submitted on April 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. PoliticsWar, World IWar, World II
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 6, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 4, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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