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Cearfoss in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Crossing the Mason and Dixon

Pennsylvania, at Last!

 

—Gettysburg Campaign —

 
Crossing the Mason and Dixon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
1. Crossing the Mason and Dixon Marker
Inscription. Four thousands of Confederates in Gen. Robert E. Lee's invasion of the North in 1863, the rate of march exceeded thirty miles a day. Since this part of Maryland is so narrow, splashing across the Potomac River in the morning and crossing the Mason and Dixon Line by afternoon became a daily routine.

William Christian shares his thoughts as an "invader" with his wife: "We are paying back these people for some of the damage they have done to us, though we are not doing them half as bad as they done us. ... I felt when I first came here that I would like to revenge myself upon these people for the desolation they have brought upon our own beautiful home. ... Yet when I got among these people I could not find it in my heart to molest them."

As a diversion from the march, men would sometimes break ranks and head for a local farm, where they would engaged in milking contests, seeking to discover who was best at aiming milk into a canteen.

"We were now in the enemy's country, and getting our supplies entirely from the country people. These supplies were taken from mills, storehouses, and the farmers, under a regular system ordered by General Lee, and with a due regard to wants of the inhabitants themselves, certificates being given in all cases. There was no marauding or indiscriminate plundering, but all such acts were
Crossing the Mason and Dixon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 22, 2012
2. Crossing the Mason and Dixon Marker
The marker appears to have been damaged since the original photo 4 years prior.
expressly forbidden and prohibited effectually."

-Gen. Jubal A. Early
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 41.999′ N, 77° 46.622′ W. Marker is in Cearfoss, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is at the intersection of Fairview Road (County Route 494) and Greencastle Pike (Maryland Road 63), on the right when traveling east on Fairview Road. Touch for map. Located in a parking lot of a convenience store, in the southwest corner of the intersection. Marker is at or near this postal address: 17035 Fairview Road, Hagerstown MD 21740, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gettysburg Campaign (here, next to this marker); Mason and Dixon Line (approx. 1.5 miles away); a different marker also named Gettysburg Campaign (approx. 3.6 miles away in Pennsylvania); Shielding the Army (approx. 4.1 miles away); Corporal William Othello Wilson (approx. 4.7 miles away); Wilson Bridge (approx. 4.7 miles away); The Cumberland Valley Railroad
Civil War Trails Markers image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 22, 2012
3. Civil War Trails Markers
Two Civil War Trails markers are found at this location. The Crossing the Mason and Dixon marker is seen here on the right.
(approx. 4.7 miles away); a different marker also named Wilson Bridge (approx. 4.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cearfoss.
 
More about this marker. In the upper center is a drawing of Confederate infantrymen marching north to Pennsylvania. A map in the upper right shows the routes taken by the elements of both armies passing through Maryland. To the lower right is a portrait of General Early.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Map of the Route of Advancing Armies image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
4. Map of the Route of Advancing Armies
A Civil War Trails Wayside image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 16, 2008
5. A Civil War Trails Wayside
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,634 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on September 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3. submitted on August 22, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on September 20, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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