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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fountaindale in Adams County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Fountaindale Lutheran Church and Cemetery

 
 
The Fountaindale Lutheran Church and Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 7, 2018
1. The Fountaindale Lutheran Church and Cemetery Marker
Inscription.
At this site, on December 8, 1842, the Lutheran Church of Fountaindale was consecrated by pastor Solomon Sentman. The church was built on land owned by Joseph and Isaac Baugher, and previously owned by Daniel Sprenkle. In 1842, there were 55 members, and the membership grew to its peak of 95 by late 1843. In 1855, a new Lutheran Church was built at Fairfield, and by 1859, the last know Pastor here, Henry Bishop, no longer reported Fountaindale as one of his congregations.

On April 7, 1871, the Fairfield Church authorized the sale of the building and its contents. Many descendants of these early congregations still live in the area.

Cemetery
The earliest known burial here was Daniel Sprenkle, A revolutionary War veteran who died on November 6, 1821. The may be the reason why this site was chosen for the Church and cemetery. On July 3, 1863, a Confederate soldier died from wounds he received at Gettysburg and was buried here.

Fountaindale Lutheran Church and the Civil War
In October of 1862, Church member Sandford Schroder, who owned a local sawmill and tannery, was taken prisoner near here by Confederate General J.E.B. Stuartís cavalry as a result of his “uncomplimentary words” towards them. He was released in poor health at the end of the war.

On Sunday,
The Fountaindale Lutheran Church and Cemetery site image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 7, 2018
2. The Fountaindale Lutheran Church and Cemetery site
June 28, 1863, twenty five Confederate soldiers under Lieutenant John Chamberlayne, Pegramís Artillery entered the church during morning services. They captured 20 horses, however upon their attempt to escape, Lt. Chamberlayne and six of his men were captured by a detachment of Coleís Cavalry, Company C, under Lieutenant William Horner, near the brick schoolhouse by the church. Ten other Confederate soldiers were later captured near Fairfield by Fountaindale resident and Union Private Henry Turle, of Company C, Coleís cavalry.

Sign erected by Fairfield Troop 76 BSA April 2014
 
Erected 2014 by Fairfield Troop 76 BSA.
 
Location. 39° 44.62′ N, 77° 24.801′ W. Marker is in Fountaindale, Pennsylvania, in Adams County. Marker is at the intersection of Jacks Mountain Road and Old Waynesboro Road, on the right when traveling north on Jacks Mountain Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fairfield PA 17320, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Battle Of Monterey Pass (approx. 2.2 miles away); Before The Battle Of Gettysburg (approx. 2.2 miles away); John Hanson "Hance" Steelman (approx. 2.9 miles away); The Battle of Monterey Pass
The Fountaindale Lutheran Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 7, 2018
3. The Fountaindale Lutheran Cemetery
The Union and Confederate do not necessarily mark soldiers' graves; many of the headstones are well worn.
(approx. 3 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (approx. 3 miles away); Monterey Academy (approx. 3.2 miles away); "Tapeworm Railroad" (approx. 3.2 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (was approx. 3Ĺ miles away but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fountaindale.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionWar, US Civil
 
Insert - Civil War era map image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, April 7, 2018
4. Insert - Civil War era map
The church's location on the original route of the Waynesboro Road.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 10, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 10, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 62 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 10, 2018, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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