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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Goldfield in Esmeralda County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Goldfield Community Center

 
 
Goldfield Community Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 31, 2018
1. Goldfield Community Center Marker
Inscription.
Formerly the Methodist Episcopal Church
Built 1912
Dedicated March 30, 1914

 
Location. 37° 42.471′ N, 117° 14.036′ W. Marker is in Goldfield, Nevada, in Esmeralda County. Marker is at the intersection of Veterans Memorial Hwy (U.S. 95) and Euclid Ave., on the left when traveling east on Veterans Memorial Hwy. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 165 Crook Ave., Goldfield NV 89013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Gans Vs. Nelson (a few steps from this marker); Goldfield (within shouting distance of this marker); Southern Nevada Consolidated Telephone-Telegraph Company Building (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Gables (approx. 0.2 miles away); Where’s Gran Pah? (approx. ¼ mile away); Goldfield’s Railroads (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Goldfield (approx. ¼ mile away); California Beer Hall Warehouse (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Goldfield.
 
Regarding Goldfield Community Center. This former church is one of many contributing buildings as part of the Goldfield Historic District that was listed in the National Register of Historic Places (NHRP) in 1982.
Goldfield Community Center Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 31, 2018
2. Goldfield Community Center Marker
The NRHP Nomination Form highlights the significance of this building and reads:

The First M. E. Church of Goldfield is a single story building, rectangular in plan, covered with a moderately pitched gable roof. The structure is articulated by a square corner bell tower which rises to a height of 30 feet. A double entry at the base of the tower provides access to the vestibule. The tower features a corbelled and crenelated parapet, and two rectangular louvered openings at the second level. The major window at the east gable wall is a large pointed arch opening designed in the Gothic Revival tradition with stained glass panes. Both entries at the tower are also pointed arched, although the original topiights and door leaves have been boarded over or replaced. Two pairs of double hung sash windows occur on the north and south walls. Aside from the bell tower, the other noteworthy feature of the church is the use of concrete blocks in its construction. These blocks were formed with a rusticated face to simulate stone construction. The church has been maintained and retains a high degree of original integrity.

The First M.E. Church of Goldfield is significant primarily for its architectural design and use of materials. The church was incorporated in Goldfield in June 1908 and until 1912 the congregation assembled in various locations such as the Carpenters Union
Former Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 31, 2018
3. Former Methodist Episcopal Church
Hall and Ladies Aid Hall. This building was completed in 1912 and was the first permanent structure owned by the church.

The significance of the building is derived mostly from its method of construction as being the only rusticated concrete block building in Goldfield. Concrete block as a building material was popularized nationally about 1910. The material was economically manufactured on the site using portable block making machines with interchangeable face molds. The appearance of cut and dressed stonework could be achieved with the use of these concrete blocks as a less expensive alternate to stone and the craftsman's labor. This structure, characterized as Norman Gothic architecture features a corbelled and crenelated bell tower, painted arch entry doors and a pointed arch, stained glass window at the east facade. The church is a well maintained structure, noteworthy as a chronological reminder of the changes in local and national construction technology.
 
Categories. Churches & Religion
 
Former Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 31, 2018
4. Former Methodist Episcopal Church
Former Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 31, 2018
5. Former Methodist Episcopal Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 10, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 10, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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