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Goldfield in Esmeralda County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Goldfield

A Generation of Boom and Bust

 
 
Goldfield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 31, 2018
1. Goldfield Marker
Inscription. Goldfield came to be, and nearly vanished back into the sagebrush of the desert, an almost a decade. From its humble beginnings in 1902 of only three small mining claims, also known as grubstakes, the town exploded and was the largest city in the state by 1907.

The biggest spike in population came between the spring of 1905 and the fall of 1906 when the population rose from 8,000 to 15,000. By 1907, Goldfield was home to 20,000 and spanned more than 50 city blocks.

The original tent camp, name Gran Pah, disappeared and was replaced with 49 saloons, 27 restaurants, 15 barbershops, 6 bakeries, 54 assayers, 84 attorneys, 162 brokers, 14 cigar stores, 21 grocers, 22 hotels, 17 laundries, 40 doctors, 2 undertakers, 4 schools, 3 railroads, 2 daily and 3 weekly newspapers.

More than $90 million in gold was produces here from 1901 through 1940, or about $2 billion at today's prices.

By 1910, mining production was declining and many property owners were dismantling their buildings and moving on or leaving the structures to the ravages of the desert. The city of 20,000 was no more, and a thriving community of about 5,000 remained. By 1920, the 5,000 dwindled to 1,500.

Bad things come in threes and so it was with Goldfield – production fell, and a flood struck the town in 1913. In 1923,
Goldfield, 1910 image. Click for full size.
Goldfield Historical Society
2. Goldfield, 1910
a fire, caused by a bootlegger's exploding still, leveled 25 blocks. Goldfield couldn't bounce back, but it didn't completely disappear either. Today's population is hardly 270 residents.
 
Erected by Goldfield Historical Society.
 
Location. 37° 42.57′ N, 117° 14.267′ W. Marker is in Goldfield, Nevada, in Esmeralda County. Marker can be reached from Veterans Memorial Hwy (U.S. 95). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Goldfield NV 89013, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Where’s Gran Pah? (a few steps from this marker); Goldfield’s Railroads (a few steps from this marker); West Side Elementary School (approx. 0.2 miles away); Southern Nevada Consolidated Telephone-Telegraph Company Building (approx. 0.2 miles away); California Beer Hall Warehouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); Goldfield Community Center (approx. ¼ mile away); Gans Vs. Nelson (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Goldfield (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Goldfield.
 
More about this marker. Marker is located behind the newly-built Goldfield Visitor Center in a new rest area.
 
Also see . . .  Goldfield Historical Society
Goldfield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 31, 2018
3. Goldfield Marker
. Read additional history regarding Goldfield. (Submitted on April 10, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
Goldfield today image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 31, 2018
4. Goldfield today
A view of Goldfield as one enters from the west on Hwy 95
Goldfield Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, March 31, 2018
5. Goldfield Visitor Center
This marker is behind the Goldfield Visitor Center, part of a newly-built Rest Area.
<i>General View of Goldfield, Nevada</i> image. Click for full size.
Postcard published by Edward H. Mitchell, San Francisco, circa 1906
6. General View of Goldfield, Nevada
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 10, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. This page has been viewed 50 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 10, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.   6. submitted on April 11, 2018. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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