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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lake Oswego in Clackamas County, Oregon — The American West (Northwest)
 

Salamander

 
 
Salamander Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 29, 2018
1. Salamander Marker
Inscription. This mass of solidified iron from the hearth of the Oswego furnace is known as a 'Salamander'. It is named after a mythological amphibian that lived in fire. Salamanders often formed in the bottom of 19th Century iron furnaces and were removed, with great effort, when they threatened to block the tap hole.
 
Location. 45° 24.66′ N, 122° 39.631′ W. Marker is in Lake Oswego, Oregon, in Clackamas County. Marker can be reached from Old River Road near Furnace Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Lake Oswego OR 97034, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Oswego Landing (within shouting distance of this marker); The First People (within shouting distance of this marker); Lower Oswego Creek Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Green Street (within shouting distance of this marker); the man from k̓axəʼkix returned with eels to feed his people (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Town (approx. 0.2 miles away); Iron Company Worker's Cottage (approx. 0.2 miles away); George Rogers House - 1929 (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lake Oswego.
 
More about this marker. The marker is found less than 20 feet away from the eastern corner of the blast furnace in George Rogers park. A similar salamander and identical marker are located less than 150 feet to the south of this one.
 
Categories. Industry & Commerce
 
Salamander and Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 29, 2018
2. Salamander and Marker - Wide View
Salamander, Marker, and Blast Furnace (1866) image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 29, 2018
3. Salamander, Marker, and Blast Furnace (1866)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 11, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 52 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 11, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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