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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near North Woodstock in Grafton County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Night the Bomber Crashed

 
 
The Night the Bomber Crashed Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2017
1. The Night the Bomber Crashed Marker
Inscription.
January 14, 1942: the reality of World War II was brought home to New Hampshire when a U.S. Army Air Corps B-18A bomber strayed off course and crashed in the White Mountains, killing two crewmembers and severely injuring the other five.

The Crash
Heading back to base in Chicopee Falls, MA, from an antisubmarine patrol, the bomber crew ran into blizzard conditions. Gale force winds, blinding snow, and freezing temperatures iced up windows, disabled instruments, and affected air spend and altitude. Lights glimpsed through a brief opening in the clouds thought to be Providence, RI, were actually, Concord, NH! The next thing the crew saw were evergreen trees, and the plane slammed into the snow-covered slope of Mount Waternomee.

The Memorial
Despite treacherous winter conditions, the efforts of the community saved the lives of the five crewmen who survived the crash. Thanks to the Woodrow Kantner Foundation, the site is now a memorial and is a protected heritage site on the White Mountain National Forest. Please treat it with the respect it deserves: removing artifacts or disturbing the site is prohibited.

For more information and exhibits, visit the Upper Pemigewasset Historical Society on Church Street in Lincoln.

The Rescue
At 7:45
Marker detail: Newspaper Article from following day (January 15, 1942) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2017
2. Marker detail: Newspaper Article from following day (January 15, 1942)
PM, North Woodstock residents heard a plane flying dangerously low, then three explosions rocked the night. Did it crash or was it dropping bombs? A search party from Lincoln and Woodstock struggled up the mountain through thigh-deep snow in -25F temperatures, not knowing what they would find.

A mile from the crash site, they were astonished to see three injured airmen staggering towards them. Closer to the wreckage were two more, alive but critically injured. Two others were dead. Soon after, a larger team arrived with local volunteers, medical and White Mountain National Forest personnel, and 30 lumbermen from a nearby camp to clear the way for rescue toboggans. At 2 AM, the first three airmen reached the safety of the highway. Twelve grueling hours later, exhausted rescuers delivered the other two into waiting ambulances.
1st Lt. Anthony Benvenuto, Pilot
Brooklyn. NY
Lacerations on head/facial abrasions; spinal injuries

2nd Lt. Woodrow A. Kantner, Co-pilot
Crawford, NJ
Fractured left forearm/wrist and broken right ankle; lacerations on head/facial abrasions

2nd Lt. Fletcher M. Craig, Navigator
Gridley, CA
Lacerations above right eye, face, and on right leg

PFC Richard G. Chubb, Mechanic
North Billerica, MA
Laceration on legs and right side of face; broken jaw

PFC
Marker detail: Woodrow Kantner photograph image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2017
3. Marker detail: Woodrow Kantner photograph
Forty-two years after his miraculous rescue, Woodrow Kantner surveys the bomber crash site. "When you see something like this you wonder how the hell you got out alive."
Robert P. Picard, Gunner
Springfield, MA
Fractured spine/hip; fractured arm; internal and head injuries; multiple hemorrhages

PVT Raymond F. Lawrence, Gunner
Worcester, MA
Deceased; body found in rear section of bomber

PVT Noah W. Phillips, Bombardier
Fayetteville. AR
Deceased; body found in rear section of bomber


Long-term protection of this site is the goal of a partnership between the US Forest Service, the Kantner Foundation, and the Upper Pemigewasset Historical Society.
 
Erected by Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture.
 
Location. 44° 2.411′ N, 71° 47.541′ W. Marker is near North Woodstock, New Hampshire, in Grafton County. Marker can be reached from Lost River Road (New Hampshire Route 112) 3.6 miles west of Sawyer Highway (New Hampshire Route 118), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located near the east end of the Beaver Brook Trailhead (Appalachian Trail) parking lot. Marker is in this post office area: North Woodstock NH 03262, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Wildwood (approx. 4 miles away); ...World War Two... (approx. 5.2 miles away); Clark's Bridge
The Night the Bomber Crashed Marker (<i>wide view; Beaver Brook Trail parking lot in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2017
4. The Night the Bomber Crashed Marker (wide view; Beaver Brook Trail parking lot in background)
(approx. 5.2 miles away); Quinten E. Mulleavey (approx. 5.2 miles away); Borasaurus (approx. 5.3 miles away); The First Passenger Carrying Aerial Tramway in North America (approx. 5.3 miles away); The Bear Show (approx. 5.3 miles away); N.H. (approx. 5.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in North Woodstock.
 
Also see . . .
1. The World War II Bomber that Crashed In New Hampshire.
One of New England's most unique memorials to those who died in World War II is found on Mount Waternomee of a B-18 bomber that crashed in New Hampshire. Raymond Lawrence of Worcester, Mass., and Noah Phillipps of Fayetteville, Ark., died there while on a mission on January 14, 1942. The two men were part of the crew of a B-18 assigned to patrol the coast of New England. In those days, German U-boats were harassing merchant ships, sinking them with abandon. (Submitted on April 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Mt. Waternomee B-18 Bomber Crash Site.
(This link presents detailed photographs of the crash site and plane remnants.)
Five weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor, a Douglas B-18 Bolo Bomber returning to Westover Air Force Base in Chicopee, Mass, near Springfield,
The Night the Bomber Crashed Marker (<i>side view; trail leads to crash site</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2017
5. The Night the Bomber Crashed Marker (side view; trail leads to crash site)
from a patrol over the North Atlantic Ocean for German submarines crashed into the side of Mt. Waternomee (3930 feet) in the New Hampshire White Mountains. (Submitted on April 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Mt. Waternomee B18 Bomber Crash Site.
This link presents map and detailed directions for hiking to crash site from the trailhead and marker. (Submitted on April 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Air & SpaceDisastersWar, World II
 
Bomber Crash Site Trail (<i>begins near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 7, 2017
6. Bomber Crash Site Trail (begins near marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 13, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on April 12, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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