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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
City of London, England, United Kingdom
 

The Daily Courant

 
 
The Daily Courant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 17, 2018
1. The Daily Courant Marker
Inscription.

In a house
near this site was
published in 1702
The Daily Courant
first London daily
newspaper.

 
Erected by City of London Corporation.
 
Location. 51° 30.854′ N, 0° 6.241′ W. Marker is in City of London, England. Marker is at the intersection of Ludgate Hill and Farringdon Street on Ludgate Hill. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 12 Ludgate Circus, City of London, England EC4M 7LQ, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Edgar Wallace (within shouting distance of this marker); The Old Bell (within shouting distance of this marker); The Palace of Bridewell (about 150 meters away, measured in a direct line); Samuel Pepys (about 150 meters away); Sunday Times Premiere Issue (about 150 meters away); T.P. O’Connor (about 180 meters away); Bradbury & Evans (about 180 meters away); The Standard (about 210 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of London.
 
Also see . . .  The Daily Courant (Wikipedia). "The Daily Courant, initially published on 11 March 1702, was the first British daily newspaper. It was produced by Elizabeth Mallet at her
The Daily Courant Marker - Wide View, Looking East on Ludgate Hill image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 17, 2018
2. The Daily Courant Marker - Wide View, Looking East on Ludgate Hill
The marker is visible here in the foreground on the left, just below and to the right of the "Leon" signs. St. Paul and St. Martin are visible in the background on the left side of the street.
premises next to the King's Arms tavern at Fleet Bridge in London. The newspaper consisted of a single page, with advertisements on the reverse side. Mallet advertised that she intended to publish only foreign news and would not add any comments of her own, supposing her readers to have "sense enough to make reflections for themselves."...After only forty days Mallet sold The Daily Courant to Samuel Buckley, who moved it to premises in the area of Little Britain in London, at "the sign of the Dolphin". Buckley later became the publisher of The Spectator. The Daily Courant lasted until 1735, when it was merged with the Daily Gazetteer." (Submitted on April 17, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Communications
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 17, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 17, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 39 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 17, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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