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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Albany in Albany County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial

 
 
Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2017
1. Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial
Inscription.
The Declaration of Independence

Was first publicly read in
Albany by order of the
Committee of Safety
July 19, 1776 in front of this
City Hall, then on this site.
This memorial of the event
was placed here by the
citizens
July4, 1876

 
Erected 1876 by Citizens of Albany, New York.
 
Location. 42° 38.89′ N, 73° 45.024′ W. Marker is in Albany, New York, in Albany County. Marker is on Broadway (New York State Route 5) north of Hudson Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is a large memorial stone located beside the sidewalk, on the grounds of the SUNY Administration Plaza Park and the former Delaware & Hudson Railroad building. The memorial stone, and the explanatory marker beside it, are both lying flat on the grass near the sidewalk. Marker is at or near this postal address: 353 Broadway, Albany NY 12207, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. SUNY Plaza (here, next to this marker); Albany - Capital of New York 200 Years (here, next to this marker); Second Albany City Hall (a few steps from this marker); Site of First Poor House in the United States
Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2017
2. Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial Marker
The following is the wording that was placed on the memorial stone immediately adjacent to this plaque:

The Declaration of Independence

Was first publicly read in
Albany by order of the
Committee of Safety
July 19, 1776 in front of this
City Hall, then on this site.
This memorial of the event
was placed here by the
citizens
July4, 1876
(within shouting distance of this marker); Henry Hudson (within shouting distance of this marker); 1st Telephone Central Office in New York State (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Fur Trade (about 700 feet away); Lydius Corner (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Albany.
 
More about this marker. This marker consists of two parts: (1) the original 1876 Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial Stone, (the engraving on which is no longer legible), and (2) the newer metal plaque, (mounted on a granite tile), which is adjacent to the memorial stone and presents the text of original. The original memorial stone is protected by a short, wrought-iron, fence-like border placed around it.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Declaration of Independence in Albany.
At the time of the Revolutionary War, Albany’s city hall – or Stadt Huys – stood here along Broadway across from the foot of modern Hudson Avenue. During the Revolution, it was the meeting place of the Albany Committee of Correspondence, Safety, and Protection. In July 1776, in the days immediately following its approval in Philadelphia, copies of the Declaration of Independence were
Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
3. Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial (tall view)
The memorial stone, surrounded by a short, wrought-iron fence, is visible on the right. The newer explanatory marker, which presents the text, is just left of the memorial stone. There are two additional, unrelated markers visible farther to the left.
distributed to and read before the public in major cities throughout the rebelling Colonies. The Declaration was read to the public here from the steps of the Stadt Huys on July 19. (Submitted on April 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Independence Day Memorial Plaque.
Almost hidden in the greenery in front of University Plaza is a low railing. The iron spikes enclose a white marble plaque. The marker is very old and barely legible, its antique lettering badly worn with age. Fortunately, a small second marker to its left translates the faded inscription. At the time of the Revolutionary War, Albany's first City Hall stood here along Broadway. It was at this City Hall that Benjamin Franklin presented the Albany Plan of Union, the first formal proposal to unite the Thirteen American Colonies, to a congress of representatives of the northern colonies and delegates from the Iroquois Confederacy. (Submitted on April 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraWar, US Revolutionary
 
View of SUNY Administration & Former Delaware & Hudson Railroad Building from near marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2017
4. View of SUNY Administration & Former Delaware & Hudson Railroad Building from near marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 24, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 47 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on April 21, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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