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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Albany in Albany County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Henry Hudson

 
 
Henry Hudson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2017
1. Henry Hudson Marker
Inscription.

Explorer, here ended the
voyage of the Half Moon
in quest of the Indies
September, 1609

 
Location. 42° 38.912′ N, 73° 45.031′ W. Marker is in Albany, New York, in Albany County. Marker is on Broadway (New York State Route 5) north of Hudson Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is a metal plaque, mounted horizontally and directly on the curb beside the sidewalk, in front of the SUNY Administration Plaza Park and the former Delaware & Hudson Railroad building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 353 Broadway, Albany NY 12207, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Second Albany City Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of First Poor House in the United States (within shouting distance of this marker); SUNY Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); Declaration of Independence Centennial Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Albany - Capital of New York 200 Years (within shouting distance of this marker); 1st Telephone Central Office in New York State
Henry Hudson Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible at bottom near right edge</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2017
2. Henry Hudson Marker (wide view; marker visible at bottom near right edge)
(about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Fur Trade (about 600 feet away); Lydius Corner (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Albany.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Henry Hudson, Voyage of the Half Moon, 1609
 
Also see . . .
1. Henry Hudson's Third Voyage.
Hudson explored the northeastern coast of America, eventually sailing into the mouth of a wide river near today's New York City. He hoped the river - now named the Hudson River - would provide a passage west to the Pacific. But after 150 miles - and reaching a location near where Albany sits today - he found the river had become too shallow to continue. (Submitted on April 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Henry Hudson.
After twice being turned back by ice, Hudson embarked on a third voyage - this time on behalf of the Dutch East India Company - in 1609. This time, he chose to continue east by a more southern route, drawn by reports of a possible channel across the North American continent to the Pacific. After navigating the Atlantic coast, Hudsonís ships sailed up a great river (which would later bear his name) but turned back when they determined it was not the channel they sought. Hudsonís discoveries laid the groundwork for Dutch colonization of the Hudson River region, as well as English land claims in Canada. (Submitted on April 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. The Twin Mysteries of Henry Hudson - His 1609 Voyage.
On September 2, 1609, the Dutch ship Half Moon sailed into what is now New York Harbor and anchored near Staten Island. For the next five weeks, the Englishman Henry Hudson and his crew of sixteen men explored the river that now bears his name. They traveled approximately 150 miles northward making contact with Native Americans and recording the observations that would eventually lead to the colonization of New Netherland. Then they returned to Europe, stopping first in England and continuing on to the Netherlands. End of story? Not quite, for two aspects of this voyage have puzzled historians and others for centuries... (Submitted on April 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ExplorationWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 24, 2018. This page originally submitted on April 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 22, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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