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City of London, England, United Kingdom
 

The London Wall Walk - 21

 
 
The London Wall Walk - 21 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 20, 2018
1. The London Wall Walk - 21 Marker
Inscription. The London Wall Walk follows the line of the City Wall from the Tower of London to the Museum of London. The Walk is 1ĺ miles (2.8km) long and is marked by twenty-one panels which can be followed in either direction. The City Wall was built by the Romans c AD 200. During the Saxon period it fell into decay. From the 12th to 17th centuries large sections of the Roman Wall and gates were repaired or rebuilt. From the 17th century, as London expanded rapidly in size, the Wall was no longer necessary for defence. During the 18th century demolition of parts of the Wall began, and by the 19th century most of the Wall had disappeared. Only recently have several sections again become visible.

Aldersgate, City Gate

The increasing threat of raids by Saxons from across the North Sea in the 4th century led to the strengthening of the City defences. It was probable that the west gate of the Roman fort was blocked and a new gate was built here at this time. This gate was of late Roman military design with twin roadways flanked by semi-circular projecting towers. These were built of solid masonry and provided an elevated platform for catapults.

Aldersgate continued as an important gate in the medieval period as it gave access beyond the Wall and ditch to St Bartholomew's Priory, the London Charterhouse and

The London Wall Walk - 21 Marker - Wide view, looking south on Aldersgate Street image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 20, 2018
2. The London Wall Walk - 21 Marker - Wide view, looking south on Aldersgate Street
the livestock market and fair on Smithfield. It was also sometimes used as a prison. On 20 October 1660 Samuel Pepys wrote 'I saw the limbs of some of our new trytors, set upon Aldersgate .. A bloody week this and the last have been, there being ten hanged, drawn and quartered.'

After being damaged in the Great Fire of 1666 the gate was rebuilt. This imposing structure was finally demolished in 1761 to improve traffic access.
 
Erected 1984 by The Museum of London. (Marker Number 21.)
 
Location. 51° 31.008′ N, 0° 5.805′ W. Marker is in City of London, England. Marker is on Aldersgate Street just north of Gresham Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 10 Aldersgate Street, City of London, England EC1A 4HJ, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Aldersgate (a few steps from this marker); French Protestant Church (within shouting distance of this marker); Cooks Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); St Mark's Hospital (within shouting distance of this marker); Northumberland House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Bull and Mouth Inn

The London Wall Walk - 21 Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Peter Jackson
3. The London Wall Walk - 21 Marker Detail
"The late Roman gateway at Aldersgate, seen from outside the City c AD 375. Reconstruction
(within shouting distance of this marker); The boundary of St Botolph (within shouting distance of this marker); Noble Street Garden (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of London.
 
Also see . . .
1. Londonís Roman City Wall (Historic UK). "From around 200 AD, the shape of London was defined by one single structure; itís massive city wall. From Tower Hill in the East to Blackfriars Station in the West, the wall stretched for two miles around the ancient City of London....With only a few exceptions, the line of the wall remained unchanged for 1700 years...." (Submitted on May 8, 2018.) 

2. London Wall (Wikipedia). "The London Wall was the defensive wall first built by the Romans around Londinium, their strategically important port town on the River Thames in what is now London, England, and subsequently maintained until the 18th century....Until the later Middle Ages, the wall defined the boundaries of the City of London....Although the exact reason for the wall's construction is unknown, the wall appears to have been built in the late 2nd or early 3rd century.[1] This was around 80 years after the construction in 120 AD of the city's fort, whose north and west walls were
The London Wall Walk - 21 Marker Detail: Alders Gate image. Click for full size.
circa 1750
4. The London Wall Walk - 21 Marker Detail: Alders Gate
thickened and doubled in height to form part of the new city wall. It continued to be developed until at least the end of the 4th century, making it among the last major building projects undertaken by the Romans before the Roman departure from Britain in 410....The wall's gateways coincided with their alignment to the British network of Roman roads. The original gates, clockwise from Ludgate in the west to Aldgate, in the east were: Ludgate, Newgate, Cripplegate, Bishopsgate and Aldgate. Aldersgate, between Newgate and Cripplegate, was added around 350 AD. (Moorgate, between Cripplegate and Bishopsgate, was built later still, in the medieval period)...." (Submitted on May 8, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Forts, Castles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 8, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 8, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 8, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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