Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mobile in Mobile County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

It Takes a Village

 
 
It Takes a Village Marker (<i>front side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 8, 2018
1. It Takes a Village Marker (front side)
Inscription.
(front side)
Mobile’s Hidden Figures initiative originated from the Mobile United Leadership Mobile’s Class of 2017 inaugural Diversity and Inclusion team. The objective is to raise awareness of diverse community members who strive to be their personal best and to serve as role models for all youth. Our goal is to foster collaborative relationships and to present an opportunity to develop community partnerships that demonstrate the amazing strength and positive character of our port city. We value illustrating and telling the whole story of contributions by Mobile’s hidden figures, while ensuring an eye to diversity and inclusiveness.

The Dora Franklin Finley African-American Heritage Trail of Mobile (DFFAAHT) Board of Directors and the Mobile Arts Council partnered to create this inspirational space in Downtown Mobile. The Mobile Arts Council commissioned the mural and the historic marker was donated by the DFFAAHT of Mobile.

The mural depicts diverse Mobilians who have walked among us, made great strides, but often go overlooked or unrecognized in our hometown. The stories of their significant and historic contributions to the country and the world are noted on the historic marker and their faces are illuminated on the wall.

(back side)
Dr.
It Takes a Village Marker (<i>back side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 8, 2018
2. It Takes a Village Marker (back side)
Regina Benjamin – U.S. Surgeon General, CEO, Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice

Regina Marcia Benjamin MD, MBA served as the 18th U.S. Surgeon General, Vice Admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, and is the founder and CEO of the Bayou La Batre Rural Health Clinic in Alabama. Pope Benedict XVI awarded her the papal cross as Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice (For Church and Pope) - the highest medal that can be awarded to the laity. She also received the Nelson Mandela Award for Health and Human Rights and is a MacArthur Fellow.

Major General J. Gary Cooper – USMC (ret) & U.S. Ambassador to Jamaica
Major General J. Gary Cooper, during the Vietnam War, was the first African-American to ever command a Marine Corps infantry company. In 1973, he was elected to the Alabama Legislature. By 1989, President Bush nominated him to be Assistant Secretary of the Air Force. In 1994, President Clinton named him the U.S. Ambassador to Jamaica. After 3 years, he returned to his home in Mobile and became Chairman of Commonwealth National Bank.

Dr. Lonnie Johnson – Inventor & Engineer
Lonnie George Johnson Ph.D. developed advanced ceramic battery technology and invented a solid state engine that converts heat directly into electricity. He worked with the Stealth Bomber program, the nuclear power source for the Galileo
It Takes a Village Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 8, 2018
3. It Takes a Village Marker (tall view)
mission to Jupiter and the Cassini mission to Saturn. Best known, he also invented the SuperSoaker water gun which ranked among the world’s top 20 best-selling toys.
 
Erected 2017 by Dora Franklin Finley African-American Heritage Trail.
 
Location. 30° 41.445′ N, 88° 2.737′ W. Marker is in Mobile, Alabama, in Mobile County. Marker is at the intersection of North Claiborne Street and Dauphin Street, on the left when traveling south on North Claiborne Street. Touch for map. The marker, and associated mural, are located on the west side of the Mobile Police History Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 320 Dauphin Street, Mobile AL 36602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Cathedral-Basilica of the Immaculate Conception (within shouting distance of this marker); Cathedral-Basilica of the Immaculate Conception / Archdiocese of Mobile (within shouting distance of this marker); Portier House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Saenger Theatre (about 600 feet away); Wallace Turnage (about 600 feet away); Nicola Marschall Residence
It Takes a Village Marker (<i>wide view; "Mobile's Hidden Figures" mural is left of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 8, 2018
4. It Takes a Village Marker (wide view; "Mobile's Hidden Figures" mural is left of marker)
(about 600 feet away); On this Spot Woodrow Wilson Said: (about 600 feet away); Government Street Presbyterian Church (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mobile.
 
Also see . . .
1. Dr. Regina Marcia Benjamin. Regina Benjamin is an American physician and a former vice admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps who served as the 18th Surgeon General of the United States. Benjamin previously directed a nonprofit primary care medical clinic in Bayou La Batre, Alabama, and served on the Board of Trustees for the Morehouse School of Medicine. (Submitted on May 9, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. J. Gary Cooper, the first black to lead Marine riflemen in combat. A retired U.S. Marine Corps major general, Cooper made history in 1966 when he became the first black to lead a Marine rifle company in combat. He received two Purple Hearts and a Bronze Star for heroism during the Vietnam War. In 1971, he became the first black officer to command a Marine Reserve unit, a Mobile-based reconnaissance company. He also was the first black to attain the rank of general from Marine infantry ranks. (Submitted on May 9, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
"Mobile's Hidden Figures" Mural (<i>wide view; located beside the marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 8, 2018
5. "Mobile's Hidden Figures" Mural (wide view; located beside the marker)

3. Dr. Lonnie Johnson. African-American engineer and inventor Lonnie G. Johnson was born in Alabama in 1949. He earned his master's degree in nuclear engineering from Tuskegee University, and went on to work for the U.S. Air Force and the NASA space program. Growing up in Mobile in the days of legal segregation, Johnson attended Williamson High School, an all-black facility, where, despite his precocious intelligence and creativity, he was told not to aspire beyond a career as a technician. Nevertheless, inspired by the story of famed African-American inventor George Washington Carver, Johnson persevered in his dream of becoming an inventor. (Submitted on May 9, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansIndustry & CommerceScience & MedicineWar, Vietnam
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 9, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 106 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 9, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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