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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Orleans in Orleans Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Work Begins on New Orleans, Spring 1718

 
 
Work Begins on New Orleans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
1. Work Begins on New Orleans Marker
Inscription.
In this vicinity during March-April 1718, French colonists under the command of Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, sieur de Bienville, first cleared vegetation for the establishment of La Nouvelle Orleans. Bienville, who had first sailed by here in 1699, selected this site for its strategic position on an elevated crescent accessible via both the Mississippi River and a portage to Bayou St. John and Lake Pontchartrain. "We are working at present on the establishment of New Orleans thirty leagues above the entrance to the Mississippi," wrote Bienville to his superiors in Paris, France, on June 12, 1718.

Placed in recognition of the 300th Anniversary of the
founding of New Orleans
By Mayor Mitchell J. Landrieu, April 2018.

 
Erected 2018 by City of New Orleans, Louisiana.
 
Location. 29° 57.347′ N, 90° 3.809′ W. Marker is in New Orleans, Louisiana, in Orleans Parish. Marker is at the intersection of Decatur Street and Toulouse Street, on the right when traveling north on Decatur Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 500 Decatur Street, New Orleans LA 70130, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jean Adrien Delpit House (about 400
Work Begins on New Orleans Marker (<i>wide view; looking south along Toulouse Street</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
2. Work Begins on New Orleans Marker (wide view; looking south along Toulouse Street)
feet away, measured in a direct line); Louis J. Dufilho (about 500 feet away); The Steamer New Orleans (about 500 feet away); Woldenberg Riverfront Park (about 500 feet away); Bosque House (about 500 feet away); Importer's Bonded Warehouses - Henry Howard, Architect (about 500 feet away); Literary Landmark (about 500 feet away); Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Orleans.
 
Also see . . .
1. Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville. In 1716, Bienville led a campaign against the Natchez Indians. Two years later he founded the settlement of New Orleans on the Mississippi River, and four years later he made that city the new capital of the colony. When the Company of the Indies, which had been financing Louisiana, became unable to continue its support, Bienville’s enemies succeeded in having him recalled to France and dismissed as commandant. He returned as governor in 1733, however, after the colony came under royal control. His final term, which lasted for a decade, was marked by intermittent Indian wars. He voluntarily resigned the governorship
Cafe Maspero, Decatur & Toulouse Streets (<i>across intersection from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
3. Cafe Maspero, Decatur & Toulouse Streets (across intersection from marker)
in May 1743 and retired to Paris. (Submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Founding of New Orleans. La Nouvelle-Orléans (New Orleans) was founded May 7, 1718, by the French Mississippi Company, under the direction of French Louisiana Governor Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville, on land inhabited by the Chitimacha. The same year a hurricane destroyed most of the new city, which was rebuilt in the grid pattern of today’s French Quarter and streets were named after lesser royalty in the Duke’s court. Then in 1722, New Orleans was made Louisiana’s capital. Biloxi had originally been the capital. (Submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. French History in New Orleans. Two French engineers laid out the first 66 squares of a walled village, what later would be known as the French Quarter or the Vieux Carré (Old City). Streets were named after lesser royalty in the Duke’s court. Indian hunters, German farmers, and trappers traded their goods in a clearing where the French Market stands today. (Submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraExplorationSettlements & Settlers
 
New Orleans Seafood & Hamburger, Decatur & Toulouse Streets (<i>across intersection from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
4. New Orleans Seafood & Hamburger, Decatur & Toulouse Streets (across intersection from marker)
Cafe Beignet, Decatur & Toulouse Streets (<i>across Toulouse Street from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
5. Cafe Beignet, Decatur & Toulouse Streets (across Toulouse Street from marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 97 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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