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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Orleans in Orleans Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana

 
 
Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana Marker (<i>front side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
1. Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana Marker (front side)
Inscription.
(front side)
The trade of human beings from Africa to Louisiana began in 1718 with the first slave ships, the Aurore and the Duc du Maine, arriving in 1719. Those ships carried 451 enslaved Africans to the Louisiana colony. Their voyage marked the beginning of a transatlantic slave trade that continued through French, Spanish and American rule, forcing approximately 12,000 documented and an untold number of undocumented men, women and children onto slave ships bound for Louisiana.

Wolof, Bambara, Mandingo, Fulbe, Nard, Ganga, Kissy, Susu, Mina, Fon, Yoruba, Chamba, Hausa, Igbo, Ibibio, Kongo/Angola, Makwa and members of many other "nations" were deported from
(Continued on other side)
(back side)
(Continued from other side)
Greater Senegambia, the Gold Coast, the Bight of Benin, West Central and Southeast Africa. Their skills and cultural practices were foundational to the development of Louisiana. Their Middle Passage averaged more than sixty days, and thousands perished from causes ranging from malnutrition, scurvy and other diseases to the violent suppression of onboard rebellion. Those who did survive were often unloaded here along the banks of the Mississippi River. In 1808, the United States banned the international slave trade,
Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana Marker (<i>back side</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
2. Transatlantic Slave Trade to Louisiana Marker (back side)
though illegal shipments of Africans to Louisiana continued, with the last documented slave ship, the Fenix, arriving in New Orleans in 1830.
 
Erected 2018 by New Orleans Committee to Erect Markers on the Slave Trade.
 
Location. 29° 57.383′ N, 90° 3.715′ W. Marker is in New Orleans, Louisiana, in Orleans Parish. Marker can be reached from St. Peter Street east of Decatur Street, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located along the Mississippi Riverwalk in Washington Artillery Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 800 Decatur St, New Orleans LA 70116, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Woldenberg Riverfront Park (within shouting distance of this marker); The Washington Artillery Park (within shouting distance of this marker); The Steamer New Orleans (within shouting distance of this marker); New Orleans (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Café Du Monde (about 400 feet away); Work Begins on New Orleans, Spring 1718 (about 500 feet away); Literary Landmark (about 700 feet away); Evans Creole Candy Factory (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Orleans.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
Transatlantic Slave Trade Marker (<i>tall view; looking northwest toward downtown New Orleans</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
3. Transatlantic Slave Trade Marker (tall view; looking northwest toward downtown New Orleans)
New Orleans Slave Trade
 
Also see . . .
1. Markers reckon with New Orleans' role in slave trade. The practice of selling slaves in New Orleans was nearly a century old by the time the city became part of the United States in 1803. Geography made New Orleans the biggest market for the victims of the forced migration, given its location on the Gulf Coast and along the Mississippi River. Many slaves were then taken to sugar plantations in southern Louisiana or cotton plantations further north. An estimated 135,000 people were brought and sold in New Orleans between 1804 and 1862. (Submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Aurore (slave ship). Aurore (along with the Duc du Maine), was a slave ship that brought the first African slaves to Louisiana on 6 June 1719, from Senegambia. The slaves on slave ships such as Aurore, were packed in a tight spoon-like position in order to be able to carry as many slaves as possible. The slaves wore leg shackles to reduce the risk of an uprising. (Submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. New Orleans: Slavery and Remembrance. New Orleans quickly assumed an important place in the commercial and social life of the United States. With sugar and cotton plantations nearby, New Orleans developed a thriving
Transatlantic Slave Trade Marker (<i>wide view; looking southeast across Mississippi River</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
4. Transatlantic Slave Trade Marker (wide view; looking southeast across Mississippi River)
market for enslaved Africans. After the close of the transatlantic slave trade in 1808, New Orleans remained a major site for slave trading, and actually increased the volume of its traffic. Some of this was due to illegal shipments coming from the Caribbean, but most of the growth of the slave market was from the resale of enslaved Africans from the upper south to the Mississippi valley. (Submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Sighting The Sites Of The New Orleans Slave Trade. Once they arrived in New Orleans, many that came by boat were sold before even walking off the deck of the ship. But most people were brought to what’s called a slave pen. In 1829, it became illegal for slave traders to house slaves in the French Quarter. So these pens popped up on the borders. These pens were basically jails. And the eating well and physical activity was all so that the traders could sell their property -- humans -- at the highest possible profit. (Submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansColonial Era
 
Mississippi River & Crescent City Connection Bridge (<i>view from marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 10, 2018
5. Mississippi River & Crescent City Connection Bridge (view from marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 12, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 126 times since then. Last updated on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photos:   1. submitted on May 10, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 11, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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