Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Berkeley Springs in Morgan County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Dutch Cemetery

Washington Heritage Trail

 
 
Dutch Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, May 12, 2018
1. Dutch Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Palatinate Germans, called Dutch from the translation of Deutsch, migrated south to Berkeley Springs from Pennsylvania. Lots 1 and 2 of the original town plat were set aside by the trustees in 1777 for a German church and two other houses. There is no indication that any structures were built. It was variously known as the Dutch, German or Lutheran Cemetery.

Dr. Samuel Crawford was accused of poisoning and lynched in 1876. He was buried at the Dutch Cemetery and his ghost was reportedly seen standing over his grave in 1888.

In 1995, the Foxglove Garden Club restored the cemetery and dedicated three Revolutionary War soldiers' graves: Solomon Smith, Frederick Duckwall and Frederick Duckwall Jr.

The brick building perched on the hill overlooking the cemetery was originally constructed as Bath District High School in 1918 on the grounds of Mt. Wesley Academy. The Italianate Victorian that shares the hill to the south was built by Dr. John Hunter for his family in 1875.

The southeast side of the busy intersection was part of the original town plat and included three lots. Daniel of St. Thomas Jennifer, friend of George Washington and signer of the U.S. Constitution from Maryland, owned two of them. A rare Civil War encounter in 1864 occurred in a house on one lot. In 1867, noted writer and illustrator
Dutch Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, May 12, 2018
2. Dutch Cemetery Marker
David Hunter Strother, known as Porte Crayon, bought and lived in the house.

The English Tudor stone structure northwest from the cemetery was built in 1939 after razing the 19th century summer cottage of Warner Washington. The grounds encompass three lots, one of which was purchased in the original land by Samuel Washington.

The square facing the cemetery to the north contained four lots in the original town plat; one was owned by George Washington's cousin, Henry Whiting. The entire square was assembled in 1872 by Judge John Wright — a Lincoln appointee to the U.S. Court of Appeals — as the site for his Italianate Wisteria Cottage. Although the cottage remains, the land was subdivided in 1907. The westernmost bungalow was built in 1913; the other in 1920.
 
Location. 39° 37.422′ N, 78° 13.687′ W. Marker is in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, in Morgan County. Marker is at the intersection of Warren Street and South Green Street on Warren Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 302 Warren Street, Berkeley Springs WV 25411, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Original Town of Bath Lots One and Two (here, next to this marker); Capt. John Swann (within shouting distance of this marker); Community Services Building
Dutch Cemetery Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, May 12, 2018
3. Dutch Cemetery Plaque
(within shouting distance of this marker); William Weathers (within shouting distance of this marker); John Barns (within shouting distance of this marker); John Smith and John Philpot (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Edward Lloyd (about 400 feet away); John Ridout (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Berkeley Springs.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesPoliticsSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 15, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 12, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 43 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 12, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement