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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
City of London, England, United Kingdom
 

The Palace of Bridewell

 
 
The Palace of Bridewell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 17, 2018
1. The Palace of Bridewell Marker
Inscription. Here stood the Palace of Bridewell built by Henry VIII in 1523 and granted by Edward VI in 1553 to the City of London to house Bridewell Royal Hospital founded by Royal Charter in the same year. The present building was erected in 1802 and in 1862 the court room of Bridewell Royal Hospital was incorporated therein
 
Location. 51° 30.779′ N, 0° 6.263′ W. Marker is in City of London, England. Marker is on New Bridge Street just south of Bridewell Place, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 14 New Bridge Street, City of London, England EC4V 6AG, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Black Friar (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); The Old Bell (about 120 meters away); The Daily Courant (about 150 meters away); Edgar Wallace (about 150 meters away); Sunday Times Premiere Issue (about 150 meters away); Samuel Pepys (about 150 meters away); Victoria R.I. (about 180 meters away); City of London School for Girls (about 180 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of London.
 
Also see . . .  Bridewell Palace (Wikipedia). "Bridewell Palace in London was built as a residence of King Henry VIII and was one
The Palace of Bridewell Marker - Wide view, looking north on New Bridge Street image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 17, 2018
2. The Palace of Bridewell Marker - Wide view, looking north on New Bridge Street
of his homes early in his reign for eight years. Given to the City of London Corporation by his son King Edward VI for use as an orphanage and place of correction for wayward women, Bridewell later became the first prison/poorhouse to have an appointed doctor. It was built on the banks of the Fleet River in the City of London between Fleet Street and the River Thames in an area today known as 'Bridewell Court' off New Bridge Street. By 1556 part of it had become a jail known as Bridewell Prison. It was reinvented with lodgings and was closed in 1855 and the buildings demolished in 1863–1864....The name 'Bridewell' subsequently became a common name for a jail, used not only in England but in other English-speaking cities, including Chicago and New York." (Submitted on May 14, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 14, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 14, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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