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Pickens in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

John C. Calhoun

 
 
John C. Calhoun Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2008
1. John C. Calhoun Marker
Inscription.
In Memoriam
John C. Calhoun
1782-1850
Apostle of States Rights,
and Nullification.
Vice-President U.S.

 
Erected 1933 by D.A.R., U.D.C., Garden Club of Pickens.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution, and the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 34° 53′ N, 82° 42.417′ W. Marker is in Pickens, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker is on East Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in Legacy Square, infront of the Pickens County Courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Pickens SC 29671, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Gen. Robert E. Lee (here, next to this marker); Thomas Joab Mauldin (within shouting distance of this marker); Andrew Pickens (within shouting distance of this marker); Elihu Griffin (within shouting distance of this marker); Commissioners Appointed to Locate the Town of Pickens (within shouting distance of this marker); Pickens County Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance
John C. Calhoun image. Click for full size.
2. John C. Calhoun
of this marker); Major General Andrew Pickens (within shouting distance of this marker); In Honor of Elinor Knight (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pickens.
 
Also see . . .
1. John C. Calhoun. John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician and political philosopher from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress, John C. Calhoun Entry. Calhoun, John Caldwell, (cousin of John Ewing Colhoun and Joseph Calhoun), a Representative and a Senator from South Carolina and a Vice President of the United States; born near Calhoun Mills, Abbeville District (now Mount Carmel, McCormick County), S.C., March 18, 1782, (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. John C. Calhoun: The Man. In 1733, a five-year-old boy traveled with his family from Donegal, Ireland to America. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismPolitics
 
John C. Calhoun image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
3. John C. Calhoun
This 1844 portrait by George Peter Alexander Healey hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“South Carolina's John C. Calhoun was a formidable presence in American politics for nearly four decades. In that time, he served twice as vice president and sat in two cabinets. It was during his later years in the Senate, however, that he had his greatest impact as a champion of southern interests and formulator of a sectional dogma of states' rights. But even as he defended the South against attempts to curb slavery and argued for the right of states to reject federal policies, he sensed that he was fighting a losing battle. His dying words in 1850 were ‘The South, the poor South.’

One of five known versions of the likeness that the artist, George P. A. Healy, made from sittings with Calhoun in 1844, this portrait originally belonged to Calhoun himself.” — National Portrait Gallery
John C. Calhoun Cenetaph<br>Congressional Cemetery Washington DC image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 11, 2011
4. John C. Calhoun Cenetaph
Congressional Cemetery Washington DC

John C. Calhoun (1782–1850) held several government positions: Vice President (twice—with President John Quincy Adams and President Andrew Jackson); Senator from South Carolina; member, state house of representatives; Secretary of War for President James Monroe; and Secretary of State in the Cabinet of President John Tyler. He was hailed as one of the giants of 19th century American politics. Along with Henry Clay and Daniel Webster he set the terms of every important debate of the day. Calhoun was acknowledged by his contemporaries as a legitimate successor to George Washington, John Adams or Thomas Jefferson, but never gained the presidency. R60/S146” — Cenetaph Walking Tour pamphlet Congressional Cemetery.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 24, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,167 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 24, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on April 12, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
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