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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
City of London, England, United Kingdom
 

Red Lion Court

W Caslon Junr Letter Founder

 
 
Red Lion Court Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 17, 2018
1. Red Lion Court Marker
Inscription. In 1816, William Caslon IV produced the first sans-serif printing type, popularised by printers like R. Taylor, who worked in this court.
 
Location. 51° 30.859′ N, 0° 6.531′ W. Marker is in City of London, England. Marker is at the intersection of Red Lion Court and Fleet Street on Red Lion Court. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 170 Fleet Street, City of London, England EC4A 2EA, United Kingdom.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. British Institute of Professional Photography (a few steps from this marker); Johnson's Court (a few steps from this marker); Crane Court (within shouting distance of this marker); Mitre Tavern (within shouting distance of this marker); The Tipperary (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Two Famous Clockmakers (about 90 meters away); Anti-Corn-Law League (about 90 meters away); Francis Barber (about 90 meters away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in City of London.
 
Also see . . .  William Caslon IV (Typophile). "William Caslon IV is best known as the designer of the first sans serif typeface, though sans serif lettering had existed for some time. He was the great grandson of the original William Caslon, son of William Caslon
Red Lion Court Marker - Wide View image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, March 17, 2018
2. Red Lion Court Marker - Wide View
The marker is visible here embedded in the pavement at the entrance to Red Lion Court.
III who had purchased the Joseph Jackson foundry in 1792 creating a second Caslon foundry. William IV took over the business in 1807 and was evidently very creative. He invented two part matrices for casting large letters and a method of casting wedge shaped letters for cylinder printing....In 1816 William IV issued a specimen book that showed a single line of upper case sans serif letters labeled “2 Line English Egyptian” or about 28 points in size. Though Egyptian has come to refer to slab serif types only, it originally referred to all monotone or monoline stroke types. It is not known why he cut the sans, whether it was cut for a client or as an experiment, but there was no interest in it and several years would pass before more sans serif types appeared." (Submitted on May 15, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Communications
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 15, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 15, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on May 15, 2018, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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