Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Little Rock in Pulaski County, Arkansas — The American South (West South Central)
 

River Traffic

 
 
River Traffic Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 10, 2018
1. River Traffic Marker
Inscription. Ferries: Early ferry services were established as a ford on the Southwest Trail at "the point of rocks" between 1812 and 1819. Eventually, there were ferries in at least three locations serving the city, one just above the Old State House, one below the point of rocks (Ferry Street today), and one several miles below the city. The first ferries were flat bottom boats, rowed or poled across. Later they were horse propelled and finally steam powered.

Bridges: The first successful major bridge was the Baring Cross completed in 1873. Pontoon bridges attempted earlier had been unsuccessful because of the strong currents during high water.

The Junction Bridge, which rests on 'the little rock," was completed in November, 1884, and a station was built at Markham and Commerce. By 1886 or '87, rails were laid along the riverfront between the two bridge areas.

A third railroad bridge crossing at McLean Street was built about 1898, and the train station built at Second and McLean still stands today.

The automobile bridges at Main and Broadway were built in the 1920's.

River traffic was the primary means of commerce until it was replaced by rail traffic after the Civil War. The Eagle was the first steamboat to arrive at Little Rock in
River Traffic Marker (lower marker) image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 10, 2018
2. River Traffic Marker (lower marker)
1822. By the 1830's, steamboat traffic was a weekly occurance, except during the low water summer months. By 1853, there were 317 steamboats during an eight-month period.

There were two steamboat landings, known as the upper and lower landings. The upper landing comprised all the vacant space north of Water Street and to the river in the original city to the Quapaw Line. The lower landing was just below the little rock. Riverboat traffic declined during the latter half of the nineteenth century. Not until the McClellan-Kerr Waterway Project in the mid-twentieth century did river traffic begin to grow again.
 
Location. 34° 44.943′ N, 92° 16.032′ W. Marker is in Little Rock, Arkansas, in Pulaski County. Marker can be reached from President Clinton Avenue. Touch for map. Located along the Arkansas River Trail near the Junction Bridge. Marker is at or near this postal address: 300 President Clinton Avenue, Little Rock AR 72201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Little Rock Campaign - Riverfront Park (here, next to this marker); The Point of Rocks (here, next to this marker); Arkansas in the Civil War (here, next to this marker); Settlements
The two River Traffic Markers are on the left side. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 10, 2018
3. The two River Traffic Markers are on the left side.
(a few steps from this marker); It is River City (within shouting distance of this marker); Smaller Rock, Big Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Casimir Pulaski (within shouting distance of this marker); Witness to Removal (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Little Rock.
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsWaterways & Vessels
 
View of the Junction Bridge in background. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 10, 2018
4. View of the Junction Bridge in background.
The Main Street bridge with the Junction Bridge behind it. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, April 10, 2018
5. The Main Street bridge with the Junction Bridge behind it.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 15, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 15, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 73 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 15, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
Paid Advertisement