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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kingsville in Kleberg County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Englishmen in South Texas, 1568

 
 
Englishmen in South Texas, 1568 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 17, 2018
1. Englishmen in South Texas, 1568 Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  
Fifty-two years before the celebrated landing of English settlers at Plymouth Rock, in what is now Massachusetts, three Englishmen traveled this South Texas area. They were sailors who had gone to sea in 1567 with Sir John Hawkins, an admiral of the fleet of Queen Elizabeth I, on a trading voyage. At Vera Cruz, Mexico, on Sept 26, 1568, Sir John was attacked by the Spanish, losing five of his six ships. Forced by famine and overcrowding to lighten the remaining crippled ship, he put ashore 114 of his men on October 8, 1568, near Tampico. Most went south, only to be captured by the Spanish; 26 went north, had Indian fights and other misfortunes. Of the 26, only Richard Browne, David Ingram, and Richard Twide ever reached England again. That Browne, Ingram, and Twide passed through this part of Texas is evident by Ingram's testimony, given to her Majesty's secretary in 1582. He told of cannibal Indians along the Gulf Coast, described the lush grass at the Rio Grande's mouth and the sandy regions north of that river, told of large "musquetas" and of eating prickly pear fruit.

In 11 months of steady walking—only once resting as long as
Englishmen in South Texas, 1568 Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 17, 2018
2. Englishmen in South Texas, 1568 Marker (tall view)
five days—they reached Frenchmen in Nova Scotia, and a ship captain took them to Europe.
 
Erected 1973 by State Historical Survery Committee. (Marker Number 1485.)
 
Location. 27° 31.001′ N, 97° 51.608′ W. Marker is in Kingsville, Texas, in Kleberg County. Marker is at the intersection of North 11th Street and East Kleberg Avenue, on the right when traveling north on North 11th Street. Touch for map. Marker is located on the west side Kleberg County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 700 East Kleberg Avenue, Kingsville TX 78363, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Uriah Lott (approx. half a mile away); The Kingsville Railroad Depot (approx. half a mile away); Taylor Camp Site, 1846 (approx. 2.1 miles away); Bishop (approx. 6 miles away); U.S. Army March to Rio Grande, 1846 (approx. 11Ĺ miles away); 1766 Exploration of Diego Ortiz Parilla (approx. 11Ĺ miles away).
 
More about this marker. Marker is significantly weathered and somewhat difficult to read.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Longest Walk: David Ingramís Amazing Journey. If Ingram is to be believed, he and two others with him accomplished perhaps the outstanding walk in recorded history. It seems undeniable that they
Englishmen in South Texas Marker (<i>wide view; marker right; Kleberg Courthouse in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 17, 2018
3. Englishmen in South Texas Marker (wide view; marker right; Kleberg Courthouse in background)
Kleberg County Courthouse undergoing major renovation and window upgrade at time of this photo.
were the first Englishmen to see anything of North America behind the coast, as certainly Ingram was the first to report on it. Hawkins had got the Minion back to England in January, 1569, after a ghastly voyage. (“Our men being oppressed with Famine, died continually,” he reported, until “wee were scantly able to manure [maneuver] our ship.”) He must have been astounded when, a year later, three men he had left on the coast of Mexico presented themselves to him. They were David Ingram, Richard Browne, and Richard Twide, the only members of the northward-marching body to return home. (Submitted on May 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. From Walking With Time by Richard Nathan. On October 8, 1568, 100 men elected to be set ashore on the beach, somewhere close to present-day Barra del Tordo. The majority of these men went south, 50 miles to Tampico, hoping for charity from the Spaniards. But, led by David Ingram, about twenty started walking north, into what was mostly uncharted wilderness; this was forty years before the first English settlement in America. Eleven months later, in September 1569, David Ingram, Richard Twide and Richard Browne ended up near Cape Breton, in Acadia, as Nova Scotia was then called, where they found a French cod-fishing boat that took them back to Europe. So, in taking a long walk
Kleberg County Courthouse Renovation Sign image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 17, 2018
4. Kleberg County Courthouse Renovation Sign
after my own fashion, as an Englishman living in America, I would retrace the steps of those first Englishmen who walked this vast continent... (Submitted on May 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. David Ingram's Improbable Walk Across 16th-Century America. The route followed by Ingram and his men is unknown, as is the fate of all but three. Ingram says in his 'Relation' that they remained behind in various cities and towns, marrying local women. Only Ingram, Richard Twide and Richard Browne were found on the coast of Nova Scotia. No trace was ever found - or sought - of the other men. In 1569, the three travelers arrived in England and promptly vanished into obscurity. Thirteen years later, after Twide and Browne had died, Ingram's story was brought to the attention of Queen Elizabeth's Secretary of State, Sir Francis Walsingham. Walsingham summoned Ingram to be interviewed concerning what he knew of the eastern parts of the New World. (Submitted on May 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraExplorationNative AmericansWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 22, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 72 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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