Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pickens in Pickens County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Pickens County Veterans Memorial

 
 
Pickens County Veterans Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2008
1. Pickens County Veterans Memorial Marker
Inscription.
In Honor of All Men
Who Paid the Supreme Sacrifice
For Freedom in War

Greater love hath no man than this, that
a man lay down his life for his friends.

 
Location. 34° 53.017′ N, 82° 42.417′ W. Marker is in Pickens, South Carolina, in Pickens County. Marker is on East Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is located in Legacy Square, in front of the Pickens County Courthouse. Marker is in this post office area: Pickens SC 29671, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Elihu Griffin (here, next to this marker); Commissioners Appointed to Locate the Town of Pickens (here, next to this marker); In Honor of Elinor Knight (within shouting distance of this marker); Charles Ladd Cureton (within shouting distance of this marker); Hovie Alexander Nealy (within shouting distance of this marker); John C. Calhoun (within shouting distance of this marker); Gen. Robert E. Lee (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Joab Mauldin (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pickens.
 
Also see . . .
1. Congressional Medal of Honor Society. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Pickens County Veterans Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2008
2. Pickens County Veterans Memorial Marker
Marker is visible in the right bottom section of the picture. The Pickens County Courthouse provides the backdrop.

2. Complete List of Medal of Honor Recipients. The President, in the name of Congress, has awarded more than 3,400 Medals of Honor to our nation's bravest Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen since the decoration's creation in 1861. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Congressional Medal of Honor. The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States government. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Furman L. Smith. Furman L. Smith (May 11, 1925 – May 31, 1944) was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. William A. McWhorter. William A. McWhorter (December 7, 1918 – December 5, 1944) was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. SC General Assembly Resolution Honoring William A. McWhorter. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
7. Charles H. Barker
Pickens County Veterans Memorial Marker - Left Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2008
3. Pickens County Veterans Memorial Marker - Left Marker
Furman L. Smith
May 11, 1925 - May 31, 1944
Private First Class
Co. L, 135th Inf. 34th Div. WWII
Killed in action at Lanuvio, Italy
Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor
Posthumously Jan. 17, 1945

William A. McWhorter
Dec. 7, 1918 - Dec. 5, 1944
Private First Class
Co. M, 126th Inf. 32th Div. WWII
Killed in action at Leyte, P.I.
Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor
Posthumously Sept. 27, 1945

Charles H. Barker
April 12, 1935 - June 4, 1953
Private First Class
Co. K, 17th Inf. 7th Div. Korean War
Killed in action at Sokkogae, Korea
Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor
Posthumously Oct. 27, 1954
----------
These courageous men, as did many others,
fought and died for country and freedom.
----------
Erected by Pickens County Citizens
1959
. Charles H. Barker was a soldier in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. SC General Assembly Resolution Honoring Charles H. Barker. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
9. James Donnie Howe. James Donnie Howe (1948-1970) was a United States Marine who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions in May 1970 during the Vietnam War. (Submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Furman L. Smith Medal of Honor Information
Rank and organization: Private, U.S. Army, 135th Infantry, 34th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Lanuvio, Italy, 31 May 1944. Entered service at: Central, S.C. Birth: Six Miles, S.C. G.O. No.: 6, 24 January 1945. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty. In its attack on a strong point, an infantry company was held up by intense enemy fire. The group to which Pvt. Smith belonged was far in the lead when attacked by a force of 80 Germans. The squad leader and 1 other man were seriously wounded and other members of the group withdrew to the company position, but Pvt. Smith
Pickens County Veterans Memorial Marker - Right Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 23, 2008
4. Pickens County Veterans Memorial Marker - Right Marker
James Donnie Howe
Dec. 17, 1948 - May 6, 1970
Lance Corporal
Co. I, 3rd Bn., 7th Marines, First Marine Division
Killed in action at Quang, Nam Province
Republic of Vietnam
Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor
Posthumously Sept. 9, 1971
refused to leave his wounded comrades. He placed them in the shelter of shell craters and then alone faced a strong enemy counterattack, temporarily checking it by his accurate rifle fire at close range, killing and wounding many of the foe. Against overwhelming odds, he stood his ground until shot down and killed, rifle in hand. (Source: http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/wwII-m-s.html)
    — Submitted September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. William A. McWhorter Medal of Honor Information
Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Company M, 126th Infantry, 32d Infantry Division. Place and date: Leyte, Philippine Islands, 5 December 1944. Entered service at: Liberty, S.C. Birth: Liberty, S.C. G.O. No.: 82, 27 September 1945. Citation: He displayed gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in operations against the enemy. Pfc. McWhorter, a machine gunner, was emplaced in a defensive position with 1 assistant when the enemy launched a heavy attack. Manning the gun and opening fire, he killed several members of an advancing demolition squad, when 1 of the enemy succeeded in throwing a fused demolition charge in the entrenchment. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for
Charles H. Barker image. Click for full size.
By Korean War Medal of Honor Recipients
5. Charles H. Barker
his own safety, Pfc. McWhorter picked up the improvised grenade and deliberately held it close to his body, bending over and turning away from his companion. The charge exploded, killing him instantly, but leaving his assistant unharmed. Pfc. McWhorter's outstanding heroism and supreme sacrifice in shielding a comrade reflect the highest traditions of the military service. (Source: http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/wwII-m-s.html)
    — Submitted September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

3. Charles H. Barker Medal of Honor Information
Rank and organization: Private First Class (then Pvt.), U.S. Army, Company K, 17th Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division. Place and date: Near Sokkogae, Korea, 4 June 1953. Entered service at: Pickens County, S.C. Born: 12 April 1935, Pickens County, S.C. G.O. No.: 37, 7 June 1955. Citation: Pfc. Barker, a member of Company K, distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and indomitable courage above and beyond the call of duty in action against the enemy. While participating in a combat patrol engaged in screening an approach to "Pork-Chop Outpost," Pfc. Barker and his companions surprised and engaged an enemy group digging emplacements on the slope. Totally unprepared, the hostile troops sought cover. After ordering
James Donnie Howe image. Click for full size.
By Marine Corps biography
6. James Donnie Howe
Pfc. Barker and a comrade to lay down a base of fire, the patrol leader maneuvered the remainder of the platoon to a vantage point on higher ground. Pfc. Barker moved to an open area firing his rifle and hurling grenades on the hostile positions. As enemy action increased in volume and intensity, mortar bursts fell on friendly positions, ammunition was in critical supply, and the platoon was ordered to withdraw into a perimeter defense preparatory to moving back to the outpost. Voluntarily electing to cover the retrograde movement, he gallantly maintained a defense and was last seen in close hand-to-hand combat with the enemy. Pfc. Barker's unflinching courage, consummate devotion to duty, and supreme sacrifice enabled the patrol to complete the mission and effect an orderly withdrawal to friendly lines, reflecting lasting glory upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the military service. (Source: http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/vietnam-a-l.html)
    — Submitted September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

4. James D. Howe Medal of Honor Information
Rank and organization: Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, Company I, 3d Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division. Place and date: Republic of Vietnam, 6 May 1970. Entered service at: Fort Jackson, S.C. Born: 17 December 1948, Six Mile, Pickens, S.C. Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a rifleman with Company I, during operations against enemy forces. In the early morning hours L/Cpl. Howe and 2 other marines were occupying a defensive position in a sandy beach area fronted by bamboo thickets. Enemy sappers suddenly launched a grenade attack against the position, utilizing the cover of darkness to carry out their assault. Following the initial explosions of the grenades, L/Cpl. Howe and his 2 comrades moved to a more advantageous position in order to return suppressive fire. When an enemy grenade landed in their midst, L/Cpl. Howe immediately shouted a warning and then threw himself upon the deadly missile, thereby protecting the lives of the fellow marines. His heroic and selfless action was in keeping with the finest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the U.S. Naval Service. He valiantly gave his life in the service of his country. (Source: http://www.history.army.mil/html/moh/vietnam-a-l.html)
    — Submitted September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Military
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,527 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 25, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
Paid Advertisement