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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Staunton, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind

Founded 1839

 
 
The Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
1. The Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind Marker
Inscription. A state residential school created by an act of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Virginia on March 31, 1838 for the purpose of educating the deaf and the blind children of the state.
 
Erected 1961 by Virginia State Library. (Marker Number I-16.)
 
Location. 38° 8.922′ N, 79° 3.69′ W. Marker is in Staunton, Virginia. Marker is on Commerce Road (Bypass U.S. 11) south of Statler Boulevard. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Staunton VA 24401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Woodrow Wilson Birthplace (approx. 0.4 miles away); Birthplace of Woodrow Wilson (approx. 0.4 miles away); Dr. William Fleming (approx. half a mile away); Augusta County (approx. 0.6 miles away); Mary Baldwin College (approx. 0.6 miles away); Augusta County World War I Memorial Tablet (approx. 0.6 miles away); Dr. Alexander Humphreys (approx. 0.6 miles away); T. J. Collins & Son (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Staunton.
 
Also see . . .  School’s Official Website. “One of the oldest schools in Virginia and the second of its kind in the world...” (Submitted on September 26, 2008.)
The Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, September 24, 2008
2. The Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind Marker
The school campus is to the right behind a line of trees. It is not accessible from this highway.
 
 
Additional comments.
1. VSDB in the Civil War
These buildings were taken for use as a Confederate hospital in 1861.

In August 1861, the 52nd Virginia Infantry made camp here and trained before heading off to war.

Within that same month, the buildings here housed as many as 500 sick soldiers. The hospital saw a significant number of wounded in the wake of the Battle of Gettysburg. One local, Col. William D. Stuart of the 56th Virginia Infantry, was wounded in Pickett's charge and died here on July 30, 1863.
    — Submitted March 17, 2009, by Robert H. Moore, II of Winchester, Virginia.

 
Categories. Education
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 26, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,788 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 26, 2008, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
 
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