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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brownsville in Cameron County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Immaculate Conception Cathedral

- 1854 -

 
 
Immaculate Conception Cathedral image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2018
1. Immaculate Conception Cathedral
Inscription.
(English))
Built in 1854-1859, the cathedral was designed by French architect Father Pierre Keralum of the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate. The cathedral is Gothic Revival in the ecclesiastical form with a Latin cross plan. During the Mexican Revolution, priests and bishops fleeing Mexico were hidden in the rectory. The cathedral exterior was restored in 1963 and in 1970.

(Spanish))
Construida 1854-1859 la catedral fue disenada por el arquitecto frances Padre Pierre Keralum de los Misioneros Oblatos de Maria Inmaculada. La arquitectura es neogotica en la forma eclesiastica y tiene una planta en forma de cruz. Durante la Revolucion sacerdotes y obispos huyendo de Mexico se escondian en la rectoria. El exterior de la catedral fue restaurada en 1963 y en 1970.
 
Erected by Brownsville Historical Association.
 
Location. 25° 54.163′ N, 97° 29.769′ W. Marker is in Brownsville, Texas, in Cameron County. Marker is on East 12th Street west of East Jefferson Street, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1218 E Jefferson St, Brownsville TX 78520, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Immaculate Conception Cathedral
Immaculate Conception Cathedral Marker (<i>tall view; cathedral entrance in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2018
2. Immaculate Conception Cathedral Marker (tall view; cathedral entrance in background)
(here, next to this marker); La Catedral del la Inmaculada Concepcion (a few steps from this marker); Father Pierre Yves Keralum (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Immaculate Conception Cathedral (a few steps from this marker); Old County Courthouse Rio Grande Lodge No. 81 (within shouting distance of this marker); 1882 Cameron County Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Cameron County Courthouse of 1883-1914 (within shouting distance of this marker); The Oblates of Mary Immaculate (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brownsville.
 
More about this marker. Marker is in the Brownsville Historical Trails series.
 
Regarding Immaculate Conception Cathedral. National Register of Historic Places (1980), Recorded Texas Historic Landmark (1962), National Catholic Historical Site (2016)
 
Also see . . .  The Mexican Revolution. The Mexican Revolution
Immaculate Conception Cathedral (<i>marker visible at left</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2018
3. Immaculate Conception Cathedral (marker visible at left)
began in November 1910. Mexico went through the motions of another presidential election to unseat the incumbent, Porfirio Díaz, who had served since 1876. Early, Díaz dismissed opponent Madero's chances but arrested and imprisoned him when he gained popular support. Madero's family quickly posted bail, and in October 1910 the erstwhile presidential contestant fled to San Antonio, where he established his headquarters and issued, through the Plan de San Luis Potosí, a call to arms for November 20, 1910. From the end of that year until 1920, the events surrounding the Mexican Revolution influenced life along the Texas border from Brownsville to El Paso. (Submitted on May 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureChurches & ReligionHispanic Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 31, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 46 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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