Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Raymondville in Willacy County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Willacy County

 
 
Willacy County Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 17, 2018
1. Willacy County Marker
Inscription.
Formed from Cameron and Hidalgo counties
Created March 11, 1911
Organized August 12, 1911
Recreated April 20, 1921
Reorganized August 3, 1921

Named in honor of
John G. Willacy
November 10, 1859 September 19, 1913
Member of the Texas Legislature 1900-1916
State Tax Commissioner, 1922-1926

County Seat — Sarita 1911
Raymondville since 1921
Erected by State of Texas 1936
Restored — 1968
 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 5814.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 26° 28.925′ N, 97° 47.227′ W. Marker is in Raymondville, Texas, in Willacy County. Marker is at the intersection of West Hidalgo Avenue (State Highway 186) and North 4th Street, on the right when traveling west on West Hidalgo Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is located near the southeast corner of the Willacy County Courthouse grounds. Marker is at or near this postal address: 523 W Hidalgo Ave, Raymondville TX 78580, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Willacy County Courthouse
Willacy County Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 17, 2018
2. Willacy County Marker (tall view)
(a few steps from this marker); Santa Maria de Yciar, San Esteban, Espiritu Santu (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line).
 
Also see . . .
1. Willacy County. Willacy County, in the Rio Grande valley of South Texas, is thirty miles north of Mexico. The county area fell within the territory between the Rio Grande and Nueces River, disputed after the Texas Revolution. Gen. Zachary Taylor crossed the Arroyo Colorado at Paso Real when he was in the area during the Mexican War. During the Civil War Paso Real became an important crossing point for Confederate cotton exports. When Philip H. Sheridan reached the area with his cavalry in May 1865, he quipped, "If I possessed both Texas and Hell, I'd rent out Texas and live in Hell." (Submitted on May 31, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Willacy County Had A Smelly Start. Onions, which were started back in 1907, are responsible for Willacy County's place in history. From them the county has gained world wide recognition. Back in 1907 the idea was conveyed to some of the early settlers that it was possible to raise onions in this section of the Rio Grande Valley. Before that time those who had ventured to this section of the country had met failure with some of the experiments in planting various crops and there was some hesitance about the growing of onions. (Submitted on May 31, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Willacy County Marker (<i>wide view; Willacy County Courthouse in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 17, 2018
3. Willacy County Marker (wide view; Willacy County Courthouse in background)
 
 
Willacy County Courthouse (<i>view from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 17, 2018
4. Willacy County Courthouse (view from near marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 1, 2018. This page originally submitted on May 31, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 62 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 31, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement