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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Perote Prisoners

 
 
Perote Prisoners Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 21, 2018
1. Perote Prisoners Marker
Inscription.
Here 56 Texans gathered in home of Samuel A. Maverick, Sept. 11, 1842, to defend city in surprise attack of 1800 Mexicans under Gen. Adrian Woll. Maverick and 52 others were captured and marched to Perote in southern Mexico. On March 30, 1843, through efforts of Gen. Waddy Thompson, U.S. Minister to Mexico, Maverick was released by dictator Santa Anna.

Elected to office while a Perote prisoner, he returned home to serve in the Congress of the Republic of Texas.

The last of Perote prisoners were freed on March 24, 1844.
 
Erected 1967 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13379.)
 
Location. 29° 25.499′ N, 98° 29.576′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker is at the intersection of East Commerce Street and Soledad Street, on the right when traveling west on East Commerce Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 119 E Commerce St, San Antonio TX 78205, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Main Plaza - Plaza de las Islas (within shouting distance of this marker); San Antonio's River Walk and Flood Control System (within shouting distance of this marker); Twin Cypress Mexican Sniper Tree
Perote Prisoners Marker (<i>wide view; marker left of door</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 21, 2018
2. Perote Prisoners Marker (wide view; marker left of door)
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Casas Reales (within shouting distance of this marker); San Antonio River Walk (within shouting distance of this marker); The Woll Invasion (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); General David E. Twiggs (about 300 feet away); Civil War Centennial 1861 - 1961 (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Antonio.
 
Also see . . .
1. 1842 Invasion of San Antonio and Imprisonment of its citizens. It is a little known fact that seven years after the Battle of the Alamo and the Battle of San Jacinto, Gen. Antonio Santa Anna launched another invasion of Texas. This time, the Texans were unprepared - they thought the war for independence had been won, and they had begun the process of conducting civil government. This is the true account of the "Woll Invasion" of 1842, in which Santa Anna's handpicked soldier of fortune, Gen. Adrian Woll and his army of 1000 Mexican regulars and 600 Presidial troops attacked San Antonio. (Submitted on June 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Perote Prison.
Perote Castle, located in the Mexican state of Veracruz, was built over
Perote Prisoners Marker (<i>view across Commerce/Soledad intersection; marker behind pole</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 21, 2018
3. Perote Prisoners Marker (view across Commerce/Soledad intersection; marker behind pole)
a seven-year period in the 1770s by the Spanish authorities in Mexico to guard one of their main trade routes and to serve as a depository for treasure awaiting shipment to Spain. The stone fortress, covering an estimated twenty-six acres and surrounded by a moat, was used by the Mexican government as a prison. In April 1843 President John Tyler instructed Waddy Thompson, United States minister in Mexico, to negotiate for release of the Texas prisoners and demand the release of any imprisoned citizens of the United States. Groups of the Perote prisoners were released from time to time through the influence of Thompson and the British minister, Lord Packenham. On September 16, 1844, the remaining Texas prisoners, about 105, were released. (Submitted on June 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. War, Texas Independence
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 4, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 34 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 2, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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