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Dallas in Paulding County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Armstrong's Advance

The Battle of Dallas - Logan's Counterattack

 

—Atlanta Campaign Heritage Trail —

 
Armstrong's Advance Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
1. Armstrong's Advance Marker
Inscription. By Saturday, May 28, 1864, fierce Confederate resistance at New Hope Church (on May 25th) and Pickett's Mill (May 27th) had convinced Union Major General William T. Sherman to move his armies eastward back to the Western and Atlantic Railroad to reestablish their supply line from Chattanooga. Commanding Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston ordered Major General William B. Bate's division of Lieutenant General William J. Hardee's corps to probe the Federal lines of Major General John A. Logan's 15th Corps. Bate's division was to determine whether the Federal trenches were still occupied. The Confederates hoped to catch the Federals moving in the open.

Brigadier General Frank C. Armstrong's Mississippi and Alabama dismounted cavalry brigade began the Confederate advance. They were joined by Brigadier General L. Sullivan "Sul" Ross's cavalry brigade of Texans. At 3-45 pm on the 28th Armstrong's men began moving west along this front. If they found Federal troops were still entrenched in strength they were to report that information to General Bate. The planned advance of three infantry brigades would then be cancelled. Armstrong's brigade approached skirmishers in Union Colonel Reuben Williams' Illinois and Indiana infantry brigade and three 10-pounder Parrott rifled cannon of the 1st Iowa Battery Light Artillery Regiment.
Armstrong's Advance Marker can be seen on right near the trees. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
2. Armstrong's Advance Marker can be seen on right near the trees.
This vulnerable position was approximately 200 yards southwest just outside an entrenched fishhook-shaped hilltop. Union Captain Charles W. Wills of the 103rd Illinois Infantry Regiment reported, "A heavy column of Rebels rose from a brush with a yell the devil ought to copyright, broke for and took three guns."

General Logan ordered more Federal infantry shifted to meet this threat. As the Confederates advanced further they encountered a much stronger Federal position on the eastern and southern brow of the hill. Captain Francis DeGress's four 20-pounder Parrot rifled cannon of Battery H, 1st Illinois Light Artillery Regiment, were placed along its summit. Confederate Lieutenant Colonel Frank A. Montgomery wrote, "...the enemy's battery [was] on the crest of the hill and in our immediate front. Just behind it were "strong works literally filled with soldiers, and it was impossible to hold what we had gained." More important, General Armstrong learned that Logan's 15th Corps was still entrenched and not withdrawing.

General Logan personally led the effort to recapture the three Federal cannon. Captain Wills wrote, "Logan came dashing up along our line, waved his hat and told the boys to give them hell, boys.' You should have heard them cheer him." Logan met the 6th Iowa Infantry Regiment of Colonel Charles Walcutt's brigade in Brigadier
Map (from marker) showing the Battles of New Hope Church, Picketts Mill & Dallas. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
3. Map (from marker) showing the Battles of New Hope Church, Picketts Mill & Dallas.
General William Harrow's division and counterattacked. Logan suffered a slight arm wound while forcing the Confederates to retreat. Confederate casualties totaled 171 while Federal casualties were fewer than 150. General Armstrong informed General Bate that the Federals were still entrenched behind strong fortifications. Consequently Bate cancelled his division's main attack. However, Bate's order was not properly forwarded to two of his brigades. Receiving no cancellation message they attacked Federal positions just to the north with disastrous results.
 
Erected by the Georgia Civil War Heritage Trails, Inc. (Marker Number 17.)
 
Location. 33° 54.422′ N, 84° 49.726′ W. Marker is in Dallas, Georgia, in Paulding County. Marker can be reached from Jimmy Campbell Parkway 0.3 miles east of Academy Drive. Touch for map. Located at the back of the Paulding Chamber of Commerce, next to the Paulding Chamber Trailhead. Marker is at or near this postal address: 455 Jimmy Campbell Parkway, Dallas GA 30132, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Rt. of Federal Line May 26 -June 1, 1864 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Federal Line (approx. half a mile away); Confederate Line
Logan at the Battle of Dallas, May 28, 1864 image. Click for full size.
By Public domain, July 19, 2006
4. Logan at the Battle of Dallas, May 28, 1864
From a sketch by Theodore R. Davis.
(approx. 0.6 miles away); The Orphan Brigade at Dallas (approx. 0.9 miles away); Left of the Confederate Line (approx. 1.1 miles away); Dallas (approx. 1.2 miles away); Dallas - New Hope Line (approx. 1.3 miles away); Paulding County (approx. 1.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dallas.
 
Also see . . .  The Battle of Dallas: “The Massacre of Noble Men”. (Submitted on June 3, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 3, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 3, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 74 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 3, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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