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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Elizario in El Paso County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

San Elizario Chapel

(Capilla de San Elzeario)

 
 
San Elizario Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
1. San Elizario Chapel Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  Named for the 13th-century French patron of the military, St. Elzear, Capilla de San Elzeario was established as part of the Spanish military garrison of Presidio de San Elzeario (also Elceario, later Elizario) when it was moved to this site in 1789 from its original location 37 miles to the southeast. After Rio Grande floods damaged the original chapel, the present chapel was built with new adobe bricks and bricks from the original presidio walls. A fine example of the Spanish Colonial Revival style, it is a tangible reminder of the Hispanic and Catholic heritage of this region.
 
Erected 1962 by Texas State Historical Survey Committee. (Marker Number 4533.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the El Camino Real de Tierra Adentro marker series.
 
Location. 31° 35.098′ N, 106° 16.387′ W. Marker is in San Elizario, Texas, in El Paso County. Marker is at the intersection of San Elizario Road and Church Street, on the right when traveling north on San Elizario Road. Touch for map
San Elizario Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
2. San Elizario Chapel Marker
. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1556 San Elizario Road, San Elizario TX 79849, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. San Elizario (a few steps from this marker); Salt War (a few steps from this marker); Los Portales (within shouting distance of this marker); San Elizario Memorial Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named San Elizario (within shouting distance of this marker); Juan de Onate Expedition - 1598 (within shouting distance of this marker); The First Thanksgiving (within shouting distance of this marker); The Camino Real (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Elizario.
 
Regarding San Elizario Chapel. National Register of Historic Places:
Presidio Chapel of San Elizario (added 1972 - - #72001358)
Also known as Nuestra Senora del Pilar y de Glorioso San Jose'
Historic Significance: Event, Information
Potential, Architecture/Engineering
Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown
Architectural Style: No Style Listed
Area of Significance: Historic - Non-Aboriginal,
Architecture, Religion
Cultural Affiliation: American Indian
Period of Significance:
San Elizario Chapel Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
3. San Elizario Chapel Marker
1875-1899, 1750-1799
Owner: Private
Historic Function: Religion
Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure
Current Function: Religion
Current Sub-function: Religious Structure
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionColonial EraForts, Castles
 
San Elizario Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
4. San Elizario Chapel
San Elizario Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
5. San Elizario Chapel
San Elizario Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Sandie Kirchner, November 4, 2010
6. San Elizario Chapel
San Elizario Mission image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, June 1996
7. San Elizario Mission
National Register of Historic Places: Added September 14, 1972 Reference#: 72001358 Note that the front of the mission chapel had not been repaired when this photo was taken in 1996.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on November 16, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 790 times since then and 29 times this year. Last updated on June 5, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 16, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   7. submitted on January 14, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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