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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Orleans in Orleans Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Importer's Bonded Warehouses - Henry Howard, Architect

The Fontaine Building

 

—The Marketplace at Jackson Brewery —

 
Importer's Bonded Warehouses Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 11, 2018
1. Importer's Bonded Warehouses Marker
Inscription.
Constructed in 1868 by renowned New Orleans architect/builder Henry Howard, this building was comprised of six bonded warehouses, serving the thriving maritime commerce of the French Quarter Riverfront throughout the late 18th and early 20th centuries.

The building was purchased in 1941 by Edgar Benjamin Fontaine, and owned by succeeding generations of the Fontaine family. In 1949, it was leased to the Jackson Brewing Company, and served for the next quarter century as the shipping warehouse for the largest independent brewery in the south.

In 1987 the building was converted to retail use by the Jackson Brewery Development Corporation, in an award winning adaptive re-use of this historic former warehouse property.
 
Location. 29° 57.275′ N, 90° 3.863′ W. Marker is in New Orleans, Louisiana, in Orleans Parish. Marker is on North Peters Street north of Conti Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is a large metal plaque, mounted at eye-level, directly on the subject building, roughly in the center of the block. Building and marker are directly across North Peters Street from Bienville Place park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 North Peters Street, New Orleans LA 70130, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
Importer's Bonded Warehouses Marker (<i>wide view; marker near center of block</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 11, 2018
2. Importer's Bonded Warehouses Marker (wide view; marker near center of block)
markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bienville Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Jean Adrien Delpit House (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pierre Maspero’s Exchange (about 500 feet away); Work Begins on New Orleans, Spring 1718 (about 500 feet away); Louis J. Dufilho (about 600 feet away); U.S. Branch Bank (about 700 feet away); Judge Fred J. Cassibry Square (approx. 0.2 miles away); Edgar Degas House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Orleans.
 
Also see . . .
1. 5 Iconic Henry Howard Buildings and Homes in New Orleans.
Now home to retailers Peaches Records and Urban Outfitters, the two-story building housing the touristy French Quarter strip was designed by Howard. (Submitted on June 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The legacy of Henry Howard, one of New Orleans' most influential architects.
His influence can be spotted on nearly every block of the Garden District, through much of Uptown and in swaths of downtown New Orleans. Nineteenth-century architect Henry Howard was known to favor the Roman arch and elements of Greek temples, but his work ran the gamut, from small shotgun houses to grand mansions, commercial buildings to hallowed places of worship. (Submitted on June 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Henry Howard, the Forgotten 19th-Century Architect of New Orleans.
A three-decade exhumation to retrieve the forgotten career of one of the most influential 19th-century
Importer's Bonded Warehouses Building image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 11, 2018
3. Importer's Bonded Warehouses Building
American architects was completed this June with the release of Henry Howard: Louisiana’s Architect. Published by Princeton Architectural Press and the Historic New Orleans Collection, the 350-page monograph by Robert S. Brantley with Victor McGee delves into archives to identify long misattributed buildings, find overlooked projects, and discover how a 40-year career alongside some of New Orleans’ most tumultuous history could fade. (Submitted on June 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. ArchitectureIndustry & Commerce
 
Bienville Statue (<i>directly across North Peters Street from the Warehouse Building</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 11, 2018
4. Bienville Statue (directly across North Peters Street from the Warehouse Building)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 9, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 5, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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