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Fort Morgan in Baldwin County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Second Battle of Fort Bowyer

February 8-12, 1815

 
 
Second Battle of Fort Bower Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, May 31, 2018
1. Second Battle of Fort Bower Marker
Inscription.
American Forces
370 Men
28 Cannon
Casualties
1 Killed; 18 Wounded

British Forces
3000 Men
38 Ships
28 Cannon (not including those on ships)
13 Killed; 18 Wounded

A map of the Second Battle of Fort Bowyer and final battle of the War of 1812. The overwhelming force with which the British laid siege to the fort is evident. However, the victory was a hollow one. Within a month of the British trump, notification would arrive that the war had ended on Christmas Eve 1814 with the Treaty of Ghent. As a stipulation of the treaty, all lands and territories gained by either side during the war were to be returned to its previous owner. Fort Bowyer was handed over to the U. S. Army on March 25th, 1815.
Image Courtesy of the Historic New Orleans Collection

The British defeated at Fort Bowyer and at the Battle of New Orleans did not spell the end of the British Campaign of the Gulf Coast. On February 8, 1815, the British returned to Fort Bowyer and began landing overwhelming numbers of men under the command of Major General John Lambert in yet another attempt to seize the fort and Mobile. British commanders relied upon high sand dune ridges to protect their men as they moved closer to the fort. Regardless, heavy artillery fired from the fort would cost the British 10 lives on the first day. Undaunted, engineers began digging trenches across the peninsula and building artillery batteries.

On the 10th, reinforcements for the British arrived from the main camp on Dauphin Island three miles away. Aggressively, they advanced their trenches continuously day and night until the afternoon of the 10th found the British mortar emplacements within 25 yards of the fortís outer wall.

At 11:00 a.m. on the 11th, General Lambert offered Lieutenant Colonel Lawrence in terms of surrender. Faced with overwhelming odds and a fort filled with not just soldiers but also 20 women, 16 children, and 3 servants, Colonel Lawrence accepted General Lambertís terms. That afternoon, British soldiers took possession of the fortís sally port until Col. Lawrence and his garrison marched out of the fort the following day.

In a letter to President Madison, General Jackson on March 24th expressed his disappointment and surprise that the fort surrendered. He would also praise Major Uriah Blue ís and his relief force which were able to capture 17 British soldiers at an advanced picket. Major Blueís forces arrived only 24 hours after Lt. Col. Lawrence had surrendered the fort. On March 6. 1815, General Jackson notified General Lambert on Dauphin Island that a treaty had been signed on December 24, 1814, and had recently been ratified by the U. S. Government. Despite this, General Lambert opts for confirmation from his own government before removing his men from the region. The British removal and transfer of Fort Bowyer back to the U. S. Would not occur until March 25. That same day, Lt. Lawrence would stand trial before a court-martial in New Orleans for surrendering Fort Bowyer. He would later be acquitted of all charges.

The Fort Bowyer Historic Wayside Project was possible through the continued generous support of the Alabama Society and Major Uriah Blue Chapter, N.S.U.S.D. 1812.
Second Battle of Fort Bower Marker image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, May 31, 2018
2. Second Battle of Fort Bower Marker

 
Erected by Alabama Society and Major Uriah Blue Chapter, N.S.U.S.D. 1812.
 
Location. 30° 13.79′ N, 88° 1.409′ W. Marker is in Fort Morgan, Alabama, in Baldwin County. Marker is on Fort Morgan Road (Alabama Route 180) 2 miles west of Dune Drive, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located at Fort Morgan on Mobile Bay. Marker is in this post office area: Gulf Shores AL 36542, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Battle of Fort Bowyer (here, next to this marker); Fort Bowyer (here, next to this marker); Noble Leslie DeVotie (a few steps from this marker); Fort Bowyer War of 1812 (a few steps from this marker); 32 Pounder Sea Coast Defense Gun (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery Schenck (1899-1923) (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. Model 1918M1 155mm Gun and Model 1918A1 Carriage (within shouting distance of this marker); Battery Thomas (1898-1917) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Morgan.
 
Also see . . .  General Lambert. General Sir John Lambert GCB (28 April 1772 – 14 September 1847) was a British Army officer who served in the French Revolutionary
General Sir John Lambert British Officer and Major William Lawrence US image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, June 1, 2018
3. General Sir John Lambert British Officer and Major William Lawrence US
Wars, the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. (Submitted on June 5, 2018, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar of 1812
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 7, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 5, 2018, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. This page has been viewed 48 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 5, 2018, by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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