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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fredericksburg in Gillespie County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Peace with the Indians

 
 
Peace with the Indians Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 23, 2018
1. Peace with the Indians Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  
Several bands of Comanche and Lipan Apache Indians lived in the region of Texas in which the Germans established Fredericksburg. Interaction between the German immigrants and the Native Americans was inevitable and potentially hostile. The Comanches were expert horsemen and posed a threat to inhabitants in their territory. The Germans were the first substantial settlers in this part of Texas that the local Indians would face. The Germans and the Comanche bands in the area soon established a peaceful relationship. Early in 1847, John 0. Meusebach, a German nobleman who led the first immigrants to Fredericksburg, negotiated a peace settlement between Comanche chiefs Buffalo Hump, Old Owl and Santa Anna and the new German residents. Soon, both groups realized the benefit of the other and trade flourished.

As a result of the peace settlement between the German settlers and the Comanche Indians, the soldiers at Fort Martin Scott never fought a battle with Indians in the area around Fredericksburg.
 
Location. 30° 14.928′ N, 98° 50.753′ W. Marker is in Fredericksburg
Peace with the Indians Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 23, 2018
2. Peace with the Indians Marker (tall view)
, Texas, in Gillespie County. Marker can be reached from East Main Street (U.S. 290) 0.2 miles west of Heritage Hills Drive, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located within the Fort Martin Scott parade grounds. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1606 E Main St, Fredericksburg TX 78624, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Natural Setting (within shouting distance of this marker); The Barracks (within shouting distance of this marker); The Braeutigam Family (within shouting distance of this marker); The Guardhouse (within shouting distance of this marker); Uncovering the Past (within shouting distance of this marker); The Sutler's Store (within shouting distance of this marker); The Town and the Fort (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Comanche Indians (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fredericksburg.
 
More about this marker. Fort Martin Scott is a restored United States Army outpost in Fredericksburg, Texas, that was active from 1848 until 1853. It was part of a line of frontier forts established to protect travelers and settlers within Texas.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Fort Martin Scott
 
Also see . . .  The Meusebach-Comanche Peace Treaty
Peace with the Indians Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 23, 2018
3. Peace with the Indians Marker (wide view)
. The final session took place on March 1 and 2, 1847, at the lower San Saba, about twenty-five miles from the Colorado River. The treaty was made between the head chiefs Buffalo Hump, Santa Anna, and others, and Meusebach - called by the Comanches El Sol Colorado, because of his red flowing beard. It was ratified in Fredericksburg two months later. The treaty allowed Meusebach's settlers to go unharmed into Indian territory and the Indians to go to the white settlements; promised mutual reports on wrongdoing; and provided for survey of lands in the San Saba area with a payment of at least $1,000 to the Indians. (Submitted on June 8, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 11, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 8, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 46 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 8, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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