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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Knoxville in Knox County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Knoxville's Old Custom House / Fiddlin’ Bob Taylor

 

—Cradle of Country Music Tour —

 
Knoxville's Old Custom House / Fiddlin' Bob Taylor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, May 30, 2018
1. Knoxville's Old Custom House / Fiddlin' Bob Taylor Marker
Inscription.
Knoxville's Old Custom House
You are standing in front of Knoxville's first federal building, the Old Custom House (1874). The Custom House originally housed the federal court, excise offices, post office, and later, Tennessee Valley Authority offices. Now, as the East Tennessee History Center, it houses a museum, a history and genealogy library, an archive, and heritage tourism information.

Stop inside for information on the Cradle of Country Music Tour and visit the Voices of the Land exhibition, covering three centuries of life, from the Cherokee and frontier settlement to the Civil War, country music, and much more. Information on the country music tour and others is also available at the Visitors Center, just a few blocks away at the corner of Gay and Summit.

Fiddlin' Bob Taylor
Robert Love "Bob" Taylor (July 31, 1850 - March 31, 1912) was an American politician, writer, and lecturer. Taylor worked in the Custom House and later served as Governor of Tennessee from 1887 to 1891. He was elected again in 1897, and subsequently served as a U.S. Senator from 1907 until his death.

Taylor is remembered for defeating his older brother, Alfred A. "Alf" Taylor, in the 1886 gubernatorial campaign known as "The War of the Roses." The campaign involved storytelling, fiddle-playing,
Knoxville's Old Custom House / Fiddlin' Bob Taylor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Joel Seewald, May 30, 2018
2. Knoxville's Old Custom House / Fiddlin' Bob Taylor Marker
and practical jokes, standing in contrast to the state's previous gubernatorial campaigns.

After the two brothers left politics, they co-wrote and presented "Yankee Doodle and Dixie." The tour was a major financial success, netting the brothers tens of thousands of dollars. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Location. 35° 57.833′ N, 83° 55.116′ W. Marker is in Knoxville, Tennessee, in Knox County. Marker is at the intersection of Clinch Avenue and Market Street, on the left when traveling west on Clinch Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Knoxville TN 37902, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tennessee Ernie Ford (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gay Street (about 300 feet away); Krutch Park (about 300 feet away); The Everly Brothers (about 300 feet away); Market House Bell (about 300 feet away); Knoxville's Market House (about 300 feet away); Death of General William P. Sanders (about 700 feet away); The Tennessee Barn Dance (about 800 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Knoxville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Robert Love Taylor. (Submitted on June 9, 2018, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.)
2. Alfred A. Taylor. (Submitted on June 9, 2018, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.)
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicPolitics
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 30, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 9, 2018, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 9, 2018, by Joel Seewald of Madison Heights, Michigan.
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