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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Sabine Pass in Jefferson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

World War II Coastal Defenses at Sabine Pass

 
 
World War II Coastal Defenses at Sabine Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, June 10, 2018
1. World War II Coastal Defenses at Sabine Pass Marker
Inscription. The natural coastal cut of Sabine Pass has long been an important military strategic point, as evidenced by the battle that took place here during the Civil War. It was no less significant in World War II, when it became one of the primary points of defense along the United States Gulf Coast.

In 1941, the U.S. Navy established a Harbor Entrance Control Post (HECP) at the pass to provide defenses against potential enemy activity in the area. Soon after, the U.S. Army installed artillery emplacements at Texas Point (3.62 mi. S) that included two 155mm Howitzer guns on Panama mounts, as well as four munitions magazines at this site. The Army's lease of land at Sabine Pass resulted in the location of a temporary harbor defense unit manned by the 256th Coastal Artillery Regiment at Texas Point. Other elements of the defense system included two base end stations, an observation tower, signal stations, large coastal searchlights, a battery commander post and part of the Coast Guard lifeboat station, originally established in the 1870s as part of the U.S. Life-Saving service. The munitions magazines also held other ordnance for area installations.

Working together, the HECP and the Army post utilized these storage magazines to service the war effort. The defense system remained in full operation until 1944, when the naval section base at Sabine Pass was decommissioned and patrols were discontinued. A caretaker force remained for some time, but the Army declared the post surplus and abandoned it in January 1945. Today, these munitions magazines
World War II Coastal Defenses at Sabine Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, June 10, 2018
2. World War II Coastal Defenses at Sabine Pass Marker
Markers visible from left to right: World War II Coastal Defenses at Sabine Pass, Fort Manhassett, Spanish-American War Fortifications
serve as evidence of military preparedness and the strategic value of Sabine Pass during World War II.
 
Erected 2004 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13116.)
 
Location. 29° 43.999′ N, 93° 52.47′ W. Marker is in Sabine Pass, Texas, in Jefferson County. Marker is on Dick Dowling Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located within the Sabine Pass Battleground State Historic Site. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6100 Dick Dowling Road, Sabine Pass TX 77655, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Manhassett (here, next to this marker); Spanish-American War Fortifications (here, next to this marker); United States Forces at the Battle of Sabine Pass (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Federal Fatalities at the Battle of Sabine Pass (about 300 feet away); Capture of the USS Morning Light and USS Velocity (about 400 feet away); Site of Fort Griffin (about 500 feet away); Richard Dowling (about 500 feet away); Union Casualties at the Battle of Sabine Pass (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sabine Pass.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, World II
 
Two of the Four Munitions Magazines at Sabine Pass image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, March 5, 2016
3. Two of the Four Munitions Magazines at Sabine Pass
These two magazines are located to the east of the main walkway through the park.
Two of the Four Munitions Magazines at Sabine Pass image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, March 5, 2016
4. Two of the Four Munitions Magazines at Sabine Pass
These two magazines are located to the west of the main walkway through the park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 14, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 14, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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