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Sabine Pass in Jefferson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

United States Forces at the Battle of Sabine Pass

 
 
United States Forces at the Battle of Sabine Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, June 10, 2018
1. United States Forces at the Battle of Sabine Pass Marker
Inscription. Federal forces in the Civil War failed in most of their early efforts to capture Texas. In the fall of 1863, after taking New Orleans and Vicksburg, their leaders attacked Western Louisiana in a renewed effort. They wished to divert valuable stocks of cotton from Confederate to Federal uses, and to cut off French troops who might come from Mexico to aid the Confederacy. General Nathaniel P. Banks, U.S.A., ordered 5,000 troops to go by sea, capture Sabine Pass, and establish a land base here. His objective was for these men to move up the Sabine River and rendezvous later with troops he was leading overland through Louisiana for a sweep into Texas.

Federal ships transporting men and materiel converged beyond the sandbars, and on September 8, 1863, began to steam north through the pass. They saw a Confederate installation, Fort Griffin, guarding the pass, but got no response when they opened fire. When they came within 1,200 yards of the fort, however, cannon fire was returned, disabling the gunboats U.S.S. Clifton and U.S.S. Sachem. Both gunboats surrendered and the rest of the fleet retreated.

Captured Union troops were taken to Beaumont. The next day, they were transported to Camp Groce at Hempstead (NW of Houston). From there, enlisted men were sent to Louisiana for exchange with Confederate prisoners.
United States Forces at the Battle of Sabine Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, June 10, 2018
2. United States Forces at the Battle of Sabine Pass Marker
Marker can be seen near the walkway to the left of the photo. The marker visible in this photo is United States Forces at the Battle of Sabine Pass. Federal Fatalities at the Battle of Sabine Pass marker is mounted on the opposite side of the concrete post.
Commissioned Federal officers were sent to Camp Ford, outside of Tyler, where they were detained for the remainder of the war. The lives of both Confederate and Union prisoners of war throughout the North and South were grim, with limited food, clothing, bedding and medical supplies.

The decisive battle at Sabine Pass allowed the Confederacy to maintain control of the Texas coastline for the duration of the war.
 
Erected 1980 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 10559.)
 
Location. 29° 44.033′ N, 93° 52.438′ W. Marker is in Sabine Pass, Texas, in Jefferson County. Marker is on Dick Dowling Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is located within the Sabine Pass Battleground State Historic Site. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6100 Dick Dowling Road, Sabine Pass TX 77655, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Federal Fatalities at the Battle of Sabine Pass (here, next to this marker); World War II Coastal Defenses at Sabine Pass (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Manhassett (about 300 feet away); Spanish-American War Fortifications (about 300 feet away); Capture of the USS Morning Light and USS Velocity (about 400 feet away); Site of Fort Griffin (about 500 feet away); Richard Dowling (about 500 feet away); Union Casualties at the Battle of Sabine Pass (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Sabine Pass.
 
More about this marker. Marker is dual dated 1980 and 2004. I assume this means it was either refurbished or relocated to this site in 2004.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of Sabine Pass - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on June 14, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 14, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. This page has been viewed 60 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 14, 2018, by Brian Anderson of Kingwood, Texas. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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