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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rock Mills in Randolph County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Pottery Shops in Rock Mills / The Potters of Rock Mills

 
 
Pottery Shops in Rock Mills Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
1. Pottery Shops in Rock Mills Marker
Inscription.
Pottery Shops in Rock Mills

After the Civil War, the establishment of the textile industry led to the growth of Rock Mills and subsequent potteries became established in town. By 1900, potteries here produced utilitarian wares covered in the traditional southern ash glaze but also some utilizing the salt glaze, favored by northern potters, and the brown Albany Slip glaze which could now be shipped in by railcar.

For much of the early twentieth century. William "Will" Davis Pound owned and operated the biggest pottery business in Randolph County at this location from the 1890s into the years of the Great Depression. This pottery site features a mound of broken pottery and ruins of a kiln and, to the right, a shop building that was built around World War I. Pound was a landowner, landlord and store owner, and, by 1903, Pound's was the primary pottery shop in Rock Mills. (Continued)

The Potters of Rock Mills

Pittman Brothers Pottery operated near this site in the 1890s. Martin R. Pittman was the superintendent and his brothers David and Wesley were potters. James Lane, a northerner named Dennis Perkins and formerly enslaved potter Edward Rushton also worked for Pittman Brothers at this time.

At this site, Will Pound employed his sons Wilner
The Potters of Rock Mills Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
2. The Potters of Rock Mills Marker
and Denson and other potters such as Jim, Earl and Will Boggs, Ralph Phillips, W. J. Shepard, Watts Gladney, Wesley Pittman, Charley Brown, and Jesse Weathers.

Jesse Weathers was perhaps the most accomplished potter who worked at this site. The half-brother of shop owner W. D. Pound, Weathers was a part-time potter who also worked in the textile mill from time to time. Some of his pottery creations included fancy shaving mugs and jugs encircled by snakes. Examples of Weather's work are in the collections of the Birmingham Museum of Art and the High Museum in Atlanta. (Continued)
 
Erected 2018 by the Randolph County Historical Society.
 
Location. 33° 9.602′ N, 85° 17.701′ W. Marker is in Rock Mills, Alabama, in Randolph County. Marker is at the intersection of County Road 91 and County Road 2206, on the right when traveling south on County Road 91. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Roanoke AL 36274, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 14 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Wehadkee Yarn Mills (approx. 0.3 miles away); Pottery-Making Families of Randolph County / Early Pottery Shops of Randolph County (approx. 2.2 miles away); Lebanon Christian Church
Pottery Shops in Rock Mills / The Potters of Rock Mills Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
3. Pottery Shops in Rock Mills / The Potters of Rock Mills Marker
(approx. 3.8 miles away); Roanoke Doll Factory (approx. 4 miles away); The Burnt Village (was approx. 13.4 miles away in Georgia but has been reported missing. ); Benjamin Hawkins (approx. 13.8 miles away in Georgia); Heard County Jail (approx. 14 miles away in Georgia); Heard County (approx. 14.1 miles away in Georgia).
 
Regarding Pottery Shops in Rock Mills / The Potters of Rock Mills. A short distance down the road from the marker is the old Pound pottery building. The Pittman pottery location was further down the road beside the old Pound homeplace. The property is now owned by Jacky Burks.
 
Also see . . .  The Randolph Leader news article on the placement of this and another marker. (Submitted on June 3, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
Looking south on County Road 91. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, June 2, 2018
4. Looking south on County Road 91.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 14, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 3, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 52 times since then. Last updated on June 14, 2018, by Craig Baker of Sylmar, California. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 3, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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