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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Galveston in Galveston County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

St. Mary's Cathedral

 
 
St. Mary's Cathedral Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
1. St. Mary's Cathedral Marker
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  
The cornerstone for St. Mary’s Cathedral was laid in 1847, the same year that the Catholic Diocese of Galveston – which included all of Texas – was established. Father J.M. Odin, the first Bishop of Galveston, traveled to Europe and secured 500,000 bricks in Antwerp for the building’s construction, also encouraging laborers from England, Ireland and Germany to come to Texas to build the edifice. Architect Nicholas Clayton designed additions in 1876 and 1882. The Gothic Revival style church is built of brick covered with stucco scored to look like stone. Spires and stained glass windows are prominent.

Recorded Texas Historic Landmark – 1968
Marker is property of the State of Texas

 
Erected by Texas Historical Commission.
 
Location. 29° 18.247′ N, 94° 47.438′ W. Marker is in Galveston, Texas, in Galveston County. Marker is on Moody Avenue (21st Street) south of Church Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker and Texas Historical
St. Mary's Cathedral Marker (<i>tall view; showing Texas Historical Medallion</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
2. St. Mary's Cathedral Marker (tall view; showing Texas Historical Medallion)
Medallion are mounted at waist-level, directly on the subject building, under a tall stained-glass window, to the left of the main front sanctuary entrance (from Moody Avenue). Marker is at or near this postal address: 2011 Church Street, Galveston TX 77550, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named St. Mary's Cathedral (was a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing. ); Galveston in the Republic of Texas (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); George Campbell Childress (about 400 feet away); Exploration (about 400 feet away); Scottish Rite Masonry (about 400 feet away); Texas Bar Association (about 400 feet away); [Galveston County] Early History (about 400 feet away); The Rt. Rev. Monsignor James Martin Kirwin (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Galveston.
 
Regarding St. Mary's Cathedral. National Register of Historic Places (1973), Recorded Texas Historic Landmark (1968)
 
Also see . . .
1. St. Mary's Cathedral, Galveston. Pope Pius IX made St. Mary's Cathedral, the mother church of the Catholic Diocese of Galveston-Houston, the cathedral for the newly established Diocese of
St. Mary's Cathedral Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible under stained glass window at left</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
3. St. Mary's Cathedral Marker (wide view; marker visible under stained glass window at left)
Galveston on May 4, 1847. At that time the diocese comprised the entire state. The original structure, including the central nave, side aisles, transept, and apse, was completed in 1848. The architect for the Gothic Revival church was Theodore E. Giraud. The design, largely inspired by King's College Chapel in Cambridge, England, is in the traditional form of a Latin cross. St. Mary's Cathedral was documented by the Historic American Buildings Survey in 1967 and in 1968 was named to the National Register of Historic Places. (Submitted on June 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Jean Marie Odin. Jean Marie (John Mary) Odin, was the first Catholic bishop of Galveston and second archbishop of New Orleans, Louisiana. Odin's greatest contribution to the development of the church in the United States was the effort that he made toward the revival of Catholicism in Texas during the period 1840–1861, in order to rebuild the church in Texas after its decline with the secularization of the missions (1794–1830) and the Texas Revolution. Odin's notable career in Texas came to an end in 1861, when the Vatican nominated him to succeed Archbishop Anthony Blanc as the ordinary of the Archdiocese of New Orleans. (Submitted on June 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionNotable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
St. Mary's Cathedral (<i>front view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
4. St. Mary's Cathedral (front view)
St. Mary's Cathedral (<i>National Register of Historic Places & 1900 Hurricane Survivor plaques</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
5. St. Mary's Cathedral (National Register of Historic Places & 1900 Hurricane Survivor plaques)
St. Mary's Cathedral image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 14, 2018
6. St. Mary's Cathedral
<i>St. Mary's Cathedral, Galveston, Texas</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1925
7. St. Mary's Cathedral, Galveston, Texas
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 18, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 55 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 18, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   7. submitted on June 18, 2018. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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