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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lexington in Fayette County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Henry Clay

 
 
Henry Clay Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 18, 2017
1. Henry Clay Marker
Inscription.
Henry Clay, born in Virginia in 1777, came to Lexington at the age of twenty and quickly established a successful law practice. In 1799 he married Lucretia Hart, daughter of one of this city’s most prominent families.

He served six years in the Kentucky House of Representatives, part of that time as a speaker and filled two unexpired terms in the United States Senate before being elected to the U.S. House in 1811. There he was speaker until 1814 and again from 1815 to 1820 and 1823 to 1825. In 1814 he was one of the country’s ministers to Ghent, where the treaty with Great Britain was written, ending the War of 1812. From 1825 to 1829 he was Secretary of State under President John Quincy Adams, and from 1831 to 1842 and 1849 to 1852 was a U.S. Senator.

Throughout his long career, Clay was famed as one of America’s greatest statesman and orators; and was a candidate for President of the United States in 1824, 1832 and again in 1844.

After his death in Washington in 1852 his remains were brought to Lexington for burial as he had instructed. The Clay Monument Association financed and erected this memorial, which was completed in 1861 and which contains the sarcophagi of Henry Clay and Mrs. Clay, who died in 1864.

In July, 1976, the weather-worn monument, restored by state and local governments,
Henry Clay Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 18, 2017
2. Henry Clay Marker (wide view)
was rededicated and enrolled on the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Location. 38° 3.447′ N, 84° 30.456′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Kentucky, in Fayette County. Marker can be reached from West Main Street (U.S. 421) 0.1 miles north of Newtown Pike / Oliver Lewis Highway (Kentucky Route 922). Touch for map. Marker is located at the Henry Clay Mausoleum within Lexington Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 833 West Main Street, Lexington KY 40508, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lexington Cemetery (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); A National Cemetery System (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lexington Historic Distillery District (approx. 0.3 miles away); Vertner Woodson Tandy (approx. 0.4 miles away); Eastern State Hospital (approx. half a mile away); Todd House (approx. half a mile away); Mary Todd Lincoln House (approx. half a mile away); Pioneer Burying Ground (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lexington.
 
More about this marker. Marker is mounted at eye-level, directly on the Henry Clay Mausoleum, just to the right of the entrance.
 
Also see . . .
1. Henry Clay Monument, Lexington Cemetery. Located
Henry Clay Mausoleum & Monument (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 18, 2017
3. Henry Clay Mausoleum & Monument (tall view)
in the center of the cemetery is a magnificent monument to Kentucky's famous senator and three time presidential candidate, Henry Clay. The monument was erected in 1857 after Clay's death in June 1852. The monument was built using native limestone and consists of a 120-foot tall Corinthian column surmounted by a statue of Clay. The remains of Clay and his wife Lucretia rest in two marble sarcophagi on the floor of a vaulted chamber at the base of the monument. (Submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Henry Clay Monument. On June 30, the day after Clay's death a group of his friends had met at the Fayette County courthouse to adopt appropriate resolutions. One of them read: Resolved, that a NATIONAL MONUMENT OF COLOSSAL PROPORTIONS befitting a name stereotyped on his Country's heart, should be erected in the Lexington Cemetery, to mark the spot where his body will repose, and commemorate the virtuous deeds of his long and glorious life. A committee of forty-one was named to carry this proposal "into successful operation." (Submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Henry Clay Facts: Slavery and Politics. Missouri's application for statehood in 1819 raised the issue of slavery and shocked the nation "like a fireball in the night," as the aged Thomas Jefferson
United States Daughters of 1812 Dedication Plaque, 2002, (<i>on ground, directly below maker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 18, 2017
4. United States Daughters of 1812 Dedication Plaque, 2002, (on ground, directly below maker)
said. Clay had advocated gradual emancipation in Kentucky in 1798, asserting that slavery was known to be an enormous evil. Though he came to terms with the institution in practice—owning, buying, and selling slaves—he was never reconciled to it in principle. When he died he owned some 50 slaves. (Submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Henry Clay: Most Powerful American Politician Who Was Never Elected President. Henry Clay was one of the most powerful and politically significant Americans of the early 19th century. Though he was never elected president, he held enormous influence in the U.S. Congress. Clay's oratorical abilities were legendary, and spectators would flock to the Capitol when it was known he would be giving a speech on the floor of the Senate. But while he was a beloved political leader to millions, Clay was also the subject of vicious political attacks and he collected many enemies over his lengthy career. (Submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesPolitics
 
Henry Clay Sarcophagus (<i>view through doorway into mausoleum</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 18, 2017
5. Henry Clay Sarcophagus (view through doorway into mausoleum)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 44 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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