Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Houston Street

 
 
Houston Street Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 21, 2018
1. Houston Street Marker
Inscription.
Houston Street, known from the 1700s until the middle 1800s as Paseo (passageway) or Paseo Hondo (deep passageway), was sloped to the San Antonio River. Nearby land drained to the river, and the usually dusty street became a muddy bog when it rained. The street was extended across the river in 1851 and named for United States senator and former president of the Republic of Texas Sam Houston. By the 1880s, commercial and residential structures lined Houston Street, which competed with Commerce Street to become the most desirable downtown address. When community leaders began work to transform the overgrown, flood-prone river into a linear park in the early 1900s, Houston Street property owners were among the first to open their buildings to face the water.
 
Location. 29° 25.603′ N, 98° 29.529′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker can be reached from East Houston Street west of North St. Mary's Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is on the San Antonio River Walk, just north of East Houston Street, on the east side of the river. Marker is at or near this postal address: 175 East Houston Street, San Antonio TX 78205, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker.
Marker detail: San Antonio River at Houston Street, c. 1870 image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy: Institute of Texan Cultures, San Antonio
2. Marker detail: San Antonio River at Houston Street, c. 1870
The river at Houston Street was a wide, tranquil waterway lined with trees, homes, and gardens when this photograph was taken in the late 1870s.
Travis Street Crossing (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of De La Garza House, Gardens and Mint (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Majestic Theatre (about 400 feet away); Twohig House (about 600 feet away); San Antonio's River Walk and Flood Control System (about 600 feet away); Twin Cypress Mexican Sniper Tree (about 600 feet away); T.C. Frost (about 600 feet away); Perote Prisoners (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Antonio.
 
Also see . . .
1. Houston Street. In 1882, store owners along neighboring Commerce Street rejected an attempt to widen the road to pave the way for mule-driven streetcars. The merchants and businessmen of the area reasoned that Commerce was too congested and developed to accommodate a widening for streetcars. The Maverick family and other Houston Street property owners jumped at the opportunity to attract more attention to their properties and, shortly thereafter, all streetcar traffic in the city was routed through Houston. Houston Street roared to life at the dawn of the streetcar age, a period that lasted for 55 years in San Antonio. The electrification of the streetcars in 1890 further solidified its reputation as a clean, enjoyable, and accessible experience for shoppers. (Submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.)
Marker detail: Balcony, 1919 image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy: Lewis F. Fisher, San Antonio
3. Marker detail: Balcony, 1919
The George Maverick family hired architect Will N. Noonan to design a balcony where café patrons dined overlooking the picturesque waterway. This image of the balcony was published in Architectural Record magazine in 1919.
 

2. Early Bridges in San Antonio. For the first 125 years of the city's existence, only a small number of wooden foot bridges, often crude suspension types, were constructed over the wild, broad, free flowing river. It was not until 1841 that the first bridge strong enough for heavily loaded wagons was installed, connecting old Main and Alameda. When this bridge was replaced by a larger one, still of wooden construction, in 1867, the thoroughfare was renamed Commerce Street. In 1851 a second heavy duty bridge was erected, uniting Rivas Street (renamed "Houston Street twenty years later) on the east side of the river, over San Pedro Creek to a narrow foot path known as El Paseo del Rio. Land immediately north of the new route, a few blocks up river from Commerce Street, was still agricultural and supplied most of the compact city’s fruit and vegetables. For many years these were the only street level bridges capable of supporting wagons in San Antonio. (Submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceParks & Recreational AreasRoads & VehiclesWaterways & Vessels
 
Marker detail: Houston Street Bridge parade, 1916 image. Click for full size.
By Courtesy: Lewis F. Fisher, San Antonio
4. Marker detail: Houston Street Bridge parade, 1916
The city’s efforts to protect the river from flooding and to landscape its banks were enjoyed by San Antonians who are seen here at a parade of decorated boats in about 1916. The Houston Street Bridge is in the background.
Houston Street Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 21, 2018
5. Houston Street Marker (tall view)
Houston Street Marker (<i>wide view; looking north along San Antonio River</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 21, 2018
6. Houston Street Marker (wide view; looking north along San Antonio River)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 25, 2018. This page originally submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 49 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on June 23, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement